Alabama Civil War Timeline: September 11, 1864

Acting Lieutenant Wiggin led an expedition up Fish River at Mobile Bay to seize an engine used by Confederates in a sawmill and to assist Union soldiers in obtaining lumber. Tinclad U.S.S. Rodolph, Acting Lieutenant George D. Upham, and wooden side-wheeler U.S.S. Stockdale, Acting Master Spiro V. Bennis, with Wiggin embarked, convoyed Army transport Planter to Smith’s mill, where they took the engine, 60,000 feet of lumber, and some livestock. Loading the lumber on board a barge in tow of Planter took almost until nightfall, and in the dusk of the return down-stream, Confederate riflemen took the ships under fire and felled trees ahead of them. The gun-boats returned the fire rapidly and Rodolph broke through the obstructions, enabling the remaining ships to pass downriver.  

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Bon Secour Salt Factory Drawing by Hazel and Richard Brough from the book “Food, Fun, and Fable.”

Alabama Civil War Site: Bon Secour Salt Works

Bon Secour Salt Works

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE
Baldwin County Alabama contributed to the Confederate Civil War activities through production of salt from the Bon Secour Salt Works which went into production in early 1863. The salt production facility was was comprised of long open sheds with a brick firebox running down the center of the shed. Iron containers positioned along the fire box and were heated by a fire and as the hot air traveled through a fire box, it boiled the brine solution in the pots leaving the salt to be collected. The brine was taken from pits dug into the area’s salt marshlands. 
In September, 1864, Union troops proceeded to Bon Secour to destroy the salt works. Captain C.W. Stone of the 6th Michigan Volunteers recorded that forces under his command destroyed 990 of the iron vats and hauled away 30,000 feet of lumber. In his official report, Captain Stone mentioned that his forces burned all that was left behind at Bon Secour including

“a number of buildings having been constructed by the Confederate forces as quarters for soldiers, the place being known as Camp Anderson.”

 

On September 8, 1864, a combined army-navy raiding party led by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant George Wiggin, USN, left the Fort Morgan anchorage at 7:00 a.m. Wiggin commanded three naval gunboats, the USS Tritonia, the USS Rodolph, and the USS Stockdale and one army transport, the steamer Planter, which had two barges in tow.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: March 22, 1865

Union Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson crosses the rain-swollen Tennessee River at Gravelly Springs in Lauderdale County, Alabama. Maj. Gen. James Harrison Wilson, U.S. Army, assembled the largest cavalry force ever massed in the western hemisphere. Five divisions totaling 22,000 camped from Gravelly Springs westward to Waterloo, Alabama.

Civil War Sites In Alabama

Alabama Civil War Sites Map

Civil War in Alabama

Alabama soldiers fought in hundreds of battles; the state’s losses at Gettysburg were 1,750 dead plus even more captured or wounded; the famed “Alabama Brigade” took 781 casualties. Governor Lewis E. Parsons in July 1861 made a preliminary estimate of losses. Nearly all the white men served, some 122,000 he said, of whom 35,000 died in the war and another 30,000 were seriously disabled. The next year Governor Robert M. Patton estimated that 20,000 veterans had returned home permanently disabled, and there were 20,000 widows and 60,000 orphans. With cotton prices low, the value of farms shrank, from $176 million in 1860 to only $64 million in 1870.

Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant

Bellefonte Alabama

Bellefonte Alabama
Bellefonte is a ghost town in Jackson County, Alabama near the site of the Bellefonte Nuclear Generating Station. It is located roughly two miles southeast of Hollywood, Alabama.  

Bellefonte was settled in the early 19th century and incorporated on December 15, 1821, when it had nearly 200 residents. Its name was a subjective description consisting of the French words “belle”, meaning “beautiful,” and “fonte”, meaning “fount.” It was the Jackson County seat from 1821 to 1859.

The James Dellet House is the only original residence remaining in Claiborne

Claiborne Alabama

Claiborne is a ghost town on a bluff above the Alabama River in Monroe County, Alabama.
Situated near the Federal Road, Claiborne began during the Mississippi Territory period with a ferry over the river.