Clanton Alabama

Clanton Alabama

Clanton, Alabama,  a growing city with a rich history, is the seat of Chilton County Alabama, the state’s largest producer of peaches. Besides peaches, some of our most remarkable natural resources are a beautiful landscape and a friendly small-town atmosphere. Located in the center of Alabama on Interstate 65, halfway between the cities of Birmingham and Montgomery, Clanton is a location ripe for business and industrial development. It is Clanton’s proximity to the new automobile plants in the state that has made our city the site of two automotive parts manufacturers since 1999.

Moonshiners of Thorsby, Alabama 1907

Moonshiners of Thorsby Alabama, 1907

Thorsby, Alabama was founded in 1895 by several Scandinavian immigrants, that allegedly came down from Minnesota and Iowa. Notably among them Theodore T. Thorson – for whom the town was eventually named, John F. Peterson, Jno. E. Hedberg and K. G. Faegre(and?) – Norwegian. 

The town grew quickly, with two hotels, a sawmill and lumber company, and two wineries being built within the first couple of years. The town of Thorsby was declared a promised land for northerners looking to relocate to a warmer climate, suitable for farming and better health. The fertile soil of the South produced grapes in large numbers, along with other fruits such as strawberries, and the peaches for which Chilton County is famous.

Chilton County Alabama Map

Chilton County is known for its peaches and its unique landscape. It is home to swamps, prairies and mountains due to the foothills of the Appalachians which end in the county, the Coosa River basin, and its proximity to the Black Belt Prairie that was long a center of cotton production.

Mulberry Creek Alabama Gold

Mulberry Creek Tributaries

Reports that all tributaries of Mulberry Creek contain gold. Mulberry Creek is a 45.4-mile-long waterway in central Alabama. It rises in Chilton County and farther downstream forms the boundary between Dallas County and Autauga County. It is a tributary of the Alabama River. Gold is present at a grade sufficient to have a strong effect on the economics of an excavation project.