Buttahatchie River: The Buttahatchee River rises in northwestern Winston County, Alabama, near the town of Delmar, and flows generally westwardly through Marion County, where it collects a short tributary, the West Branch Buttahatchee River. At Hamilton, Alabama, the river turns to the southwest and flows through Lamar County, Alabama and Monroe County, Mississippi; its lower reach is used to define part of the boundary between Monroe and Lowndes Counties. The Buttahatchee joins the Tombigbee near Columbus Air Force Base, 12 mi north-northwest of Columbus.

The Long Lost Ark of the Covenant – A Wonder Verified

Research continues on an incident that allegedly occured in Marion County Alabama. While reviewing archives at the Library Of Congress, this interesting article was found which was printed in “The Hickman Courier” in Hickman Kentucky on August 28, 1885. The article is a reprint of an article printed in the “Pulaski Citizen,” a newspaper in Pulaski Tennessee. The article(s) tell of the finding of “The Long Lost Ark of the Covenant” in Marion County Alabama. Evidently the article was republished around the country.

Alabama-Treasure-Legends

Alabama Treasure Legends

Some sites listed here may have prohibitions against prospecting. Always seek permission from property owners and obtain any necessary permits prior to treasure hunting, panning, dredging, or metal detecting.

Alabama Treasure Map

Alabama Treasure Map

Alabama Treasure Map
 

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Paintrock Alabama early 20th Century

Yuchi Gold Of Paint Rock Alabama

Paint Rock Alabama was first inhabited by Indians, then the white settlers came. One of Alabama’s most famous lost gold stories is the Yuchi Gold of Paint Rock Valley. The story says that somewhere just southeast of Huntsville, Alabama may lie a fortune in gold hidden in a cave. According to the local legend there is a cave loaded with gold ingots placed there by Spanish soldiers who were killed near Tuscaloosa Alabama by the Yuchi tribe around 1699. While transporting the gold to Florida the Spaniards were killed near Tuscaloosa Alabama.

This image of Constable J. L. McGowan standing, rifle in hand, over the corpse of ?Railroad Bill? strapped to a wooden plank, sold for 50 cents in the days following the notorious outlaw's death in March 1896.

The Legend of Railroad Bill

There is a legend in south Alabama, associated with the spirit of a man known as, “Railroad Bill”. This story, from slave cultures, during the post-Civil War era, during the reconstruction of the South, documents a “Robin Hood” type character who stole from food trains and sold the items to poor, rural southern families for less than they could buy them in general stores.

Legend-of-The-Confederate-Gold

Confederate Gold

Legend of
The Lost Confederate Gold
Two crates, each sized about 2’x3’x4′ were filled with gold and silver coins said to be around $100,000 in value and buried by Confederate forces. Some stories say the crates were made of wood, some say metal. The crates were buried when Union forces were approaching as the wagon transporting the treasure became stuck in a bog-hole near Athens Alabama. The cache was made at an 1865 era steam crossing about 4 miles North of of Athens and about 1/2 mile West of the crossing.