Randolph-County-Alabama

Randolph County Alabama

Randolph County Alabama population is located in the east central part of the state and its populations is 22,913. The Alabama Legislature created Randolph County on December 18, 1832, from lands acquired from the Creek Indians in the 1832 Treaty of Cusseta. Its county seat is Wedowee. Its name is in honor of John Randolph, a member of the United States Senate from Virginia. The first county seat for Randolph County was established in 1833 at Hedgeman Triplett’s Ferry on the west bank of the Big Tallapoosa River, about 10 miles west of Wedowee.

Mobile-County-Alabama

Mobile County Alabama

Mobile County Alabama
Mobile County Alabama was occupied for thousands of years by varying cultures of indigenous peoples. The historic Choctaw had occupied this area along what became called the Mobile River when encountered by early French traders and colonists, who founded Mobile in the early eighteenth century. The British took over the territory in 1763 (along with other French territories east of the Mississippi River) after defeating the French in the Seven Years’ War. During the American Revolutionary War, it came under Spanish rule as part of Spanish Florida. Spain ceded the territory to the United States after the War of 1812.

Alabama-Map-Morgan-County-Alabama-Map

Morgan County Alabama

Morgan County Alabama was created by an act of the Alabama Territorial General Assembly on February 6, 1818, preceding Alabama’s statehood by almost two years. The county was originally named Cotaco for a creek that flows through it.

Alabama History As Told by Melvin Cane

Indian Villages and Forts

Indian Villages and Forts
Alabama has been the home of  indigenous peoples for thousands of years. Over 100 Indian villages and towns have been identified and research leads to believe there are many more not yet identified. Our research is ongoing therefore you must consider there is much more to do and take into consideration that our information is incomplete and may contain errors. Research of historical documents is our primary source of information. Much of the information is followed-up with boots-on-the-ground research – but not all.

Native-American-Tribes-Alabama

Native American Tribes Alabama

Native American Tribes in Alabama
Native American History in Alabama
When Andrew Jackson became president of the United States in 1829, his government took a hard line. Jackson abandoned the policy of his predecessors of treating different Indian groups as separate nations. Instead, he aggressively pursued plans against all Indian tribes which claimed constitutional sovereignty and independence from state laws, and which were based east of the Mississippi River. They were to be removed to reservations in Indian Territory west of the Mississippi (now Oklahoma), where their laws could be sovereign without any state interference. At Jackson’s request, the United States Congress opened a debate on an Indian Removal Bill.

Monroe-County-Alabama

Monroe County Alabama

Monroe County Alabama

 

Monroe County Alabama, located in the southwest part of the state, has a population of 23, 068. The county seat is Monroeville Alabama. For thousands of years the area was inhabited by indigenous peoples. In historic times, it was primarily the territory of the Creek peoples, who became known to European-American settlers as one of the Five Civilized Tribes of the Southeast.  

 
Monroe County Alabama Cities:
Monroeville
Monroe County Alabama Towns:
Beatrice, Excel, Frisco City, Vredenburg
Monroe County Alabama Communities:
Megargel, Peterman, Uriah, Buena Vista, Burnt Corn, Finchburg, Franklin, Goodway, Manistee, Mexia, Natchez, Old Salem, Old Texas, Perdue Hill, River Ridge, Scratch Ankle, Tunnel Springs, Wainwright
Monroe County Alabama Ghost Towns:
Claiborne
If you would like to become a sponsor, advertise a related location, service or vacation spot that would add to the usefulness of this site, please email us: staff@digitalalabama.com. Monroe County Alabama Map

Marshall-County-Alabama

Marshall County Alabama

 
Marshall County Alabama
is located in the northeast part of the state and lies between the major metropolitan centers of Huntsville to the northwest and Birmingham to the southwest. Comprising approximately 567 square miles, Marshall County is one of the five smallest counties in the state. The population is 93,019. Its county seat is Guntersville, Alabama. A second courthouse is in Albertville, Alabama. Marshall County Alabama History:
Marshall County was created by the Alabama legislature on January 9, 1836, from Cherokee land acquired in the 1835 Treaty of New Echota. 

 During The War Between the States.

Hale-County-Alabama

Hale County Alabama

Hale County Alabama comprises more than 660 square miles and is part of Alabama’s Black Belt. It lies in the west-central part of the state wholly within the Coastal Plain physiographic section. The landscape consists of rolling prairies and coastal plains dotted with oak and pine forests.

Barbour-County-Alabama

Barbour County Alabama

Barbour County is a county Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,457. Its county seat is Clayton Alabama. Its name is in honor of James Barbour, who served as Governor of Virginia.