Native-American-Tribes-Alabama

Native American Tribes Alabama

When Andrew Jackson became president of the United States in 1829, his government took a hard line. Jackson abandoned the policy of his predecessors of treating different Indian groups as separate nations. Instead, he aggressively pursued plans against all Indian tribes which claimed constitutional sovereignty and independence from state laws, and which were based east of the Mississippi River. They were to be removed to reservations in Indian Territory west of the Mississippi (now Oklahoma), where their laws could be sovereign without any state interference. At Jackson’s request, the United States Congress opened a debate on an Indian Removal Bill.

Monroe-County-Alabama

Monroe County Alabama

Monroe County Alabama

 

Monroe County Alabama, located in the southwest part of the state, has a population of 23, 068. The county seat is Monroeville Alabama. For thousands of years the area was inhabited by indigenous peoples. In historic times, it was primarily the territory of the Creek peoples, who became known to European-American settlers as one of the Five Civilized Tribes of the Southeast.  

 
Monroe County Alabama Cities:
Monroeville
Monroe County Alabama Towns:
Beatrice, Excel, Frisco City, Vredenburg
Monroe County Alabama Communities:
Megargel, Peterman, Uriah, Buena Vista, Burnt Corn, Finchburg, Franklin, Goodway, Manistee, Mexia, Natchez, Old Salem, Old Texas, Perdue Hill, River Ridge, Scratch Ankle, Tunnel Springs, Wainwright
Monroe County Alabama Ghost Towns:
Claiborne
If you would like to become a sponsor, advertise a related location, service or vacation spot that would add to the usefulness of this site, please email us: staff@digitalalabama.com. Monroe County Alabama Map

Marshall-County-Alabama

Marshall County Alabama

 
Marshall County Alabama
is located in the northeast part of the state and lies between the major metropolitan centers of Huntsville to the northwest and Birmingham to the southwest. Comprising approximately 567 square miles, Marshall County is one of the five smallest counties in the state. The population is 93,019. Its county seat is Guntersville, Alabama. A second courthouse is in Albertville, Alabama. Marshall County Alabama History:
Marshall County was created by the Alabama legislature on January 9, 1836, from Cherokee land acquired in the 1835 Treaty of New Echota. 

 During The War Between the States.

Hale-County-Alabama

Hale County Alabama

Hale County Alabama comprises more than 660 square miles and is part of Alabama’s Black Belt. It lies in the west-central part of the state wholly within the Coastal Plain physiographic section. The landscape consists of rolling prairies and coastal plains dotted with oak and pine forests.

Barbour-County-Alabama

Barbour County Alabama

Barbour County is a county Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,457. Its county seat is Clayton Alabama. Its name is in honor of James Barbour, who served as Governor of Virginia.

Russell-County-Alabama

Russell County Alabama

Russell County Alabama

 

Russell County Alabama, located in the southeastern part of the state,  is a county of Alabama. Russell County, known as “The County of Forts,” because of the many forts that once existed within the county’s boundaries, including Fort Mitchell, Sand Fort, Fort Bainbridge, and a small portion of present-day Fort Benning (most of which is in Georgia).  was established by an act of the state general assembly on December 18, 1832, from lands ceded to the state by the Creek Indians, however, the final geographical boundaries did not exist until 1932. Russell County Alabama History:
Early settlement of Russell County as well as other parts of Alabama followed the establishment of Fort Mitchell. The fort was constructed by Georgia militia in 1813 during the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 to provide military protection for non-Indian expansion into Native American lands. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,947.

Dothan Area Botanical Gardens by Cvernon1

DOTHAN ALABAMA

Dothan Alabama
“The Peanut Capital of the World”

Dothan Alabama, in the southeast corner of the state, is a hub of commerce with an interesting and rich history. Its name derives from Genesis 37:17: “let us go to Dothan.” In addition to the area producing almost one quarter of the total peanut crop of the United States, the Dothan area serves much of the commercial transportation of the country by connecting parts of Georgia, Florida and Alabama. Dothan is the County seat of Houston County Alabama and is 20 miles west of the Georgia state line and 18 miles north of the Florida state line. Dothan Alabama History
In the late 1700s and 1800s, horse and ox-drawn covered wagons from Charleston, Savannah, and Jacksonville, creaked and groaned across the south as pioneer families searched for a place to build new homes and to start a new life. Those pioneers who passed through the vast pine forests in the southeast corner of the territory that was to later become the state of Alabama would often stop at a spring known as Poplar Head, where they would camp for a while and rest.