Alabama Civil War Actions Alphabetically by Location

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ANTIOCH CHURCH

Skirmish near, Aug. 18-19, 1864.

ASHBYVILLE

Occupied by Union troops, March 31, 1865.

ATHENS

Operations in the vicinity of, May 1-2, 1862

Skirmish at, May 8, 1862

Recoggiance to, from Fayetteville, Tenn., Aug. 7-8, I863

Jan. 26, 1864 Skirmish, Athens ILLINOIS– 9th Mounted Infantry (Detachment).
Union loss. 20 killed and wounded.
TENNESSEE– 21st Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry (Wilson’s).
ALABAMA– 11th Regiment, Alabama Cavalry.

Scout from, March 30, 1864

Skirmish at, Sept. 23, 1864

Action at, and surrender of, Sept. 24, 1864

Skirmishes at, Oct. 1-2, 1864

AUBURN

Skirmish near, July 18, 1864.

BAINBRIDGE FERRY

Skirmish at, Jan. 25, 1864

Jan. 25, 1864 Skirmish, Bainbridge Ferry ILLINOIS– 92d Mounted Infantry (Co. “I”).

Hood’s Narrow Escape Across the Tennessee

BARTON’S STATION

Skirmish at, April 17, 1863.

Skirmishes, Barton Station ALABAMA– 1st Cavalry.
MISSOURI– 10th Cavalry.

Skirmishes at, Oct. 20, 26, and 31, 1863

Oct. 20 Skirmishes, Barton Station, Cane Creek and Dickson’s Station OHIO– 5th Cavalry.
MISSOURI– Landgraeber’s Battery “F,” 2d Light Arty.
UNITED STATES-3d Cavalry.
Union loss, 1 killed, 4 wounded. Total, 4.
Oct. 31 Skirmish, Barton Station OHIO— 5th Cavalry.

BEAR CREEK

Expedition to, April 12-13, 1862.

BENTON

Skirmish near, April 10, 1865.

BIG COVE VALLEY

Skirmish in, June 27, 1864

The skirmish of June 27, 1864 at Big Cove Valley Alabama, is covered in the report of Captain Richart to Colonel Anderson and involved a detachment of the 12th Ind. Cav. Captain Richart received information on the 26th of June that Johnson’s band of guerillas was in the Big Cove Valley, six miles northeast of Huntsville. At 5 p.m. he left the post with 41 men and crossed the mountain by what is known as Franklin’s Path. He moved cautiously up the cove till 10 o’clock, and then went into camp. At daybreak they were again on the move and, after marching about three-quarters of a mile, halted at the creek to water the horses. As they started out they suddenly came upon fifteen of the enemy under the command of Parson Johnson, feeding their horses. In Richart’s own words: “I immediately attacked them, and, although they occupied a very strong position on ground that was very unfavorable for cavalry to operate upon, yet at the expiration of fifteen minutes’ sharp fighting we drove them in confusion, capturing 5 horses and equipments and wounding 3 or 4 of the band. We chased them into the hills near Blevingston Gap, a distance of two miles from the scene of the fight. After eating the breakfast prepared for the (rebel) band and feeding the horses, I moved down the valley with the captured property, safely arriving at camp at 3:30 p.m. of the 27th instant. My loss in the skirmish was, I am sorry to say, 1 man, Private John Twiford, who was mortally wounded at the third volley fired by the enemy; also 1 horse killed and 10 wounded, several seriously. The men behaved well, with one or two exceptions; much better, indeed, than could be expected of raw troops the first time under fire.”

Source: ehistory – The History Of the 12th Indiana Cavalry

The area in the gap between Monte Sano and Keel mountains has been known as Big Cove since the middle 1860s. The name Big Cove was simply derived from a description of the surrounding geography.

Big Cove rests at the foot of Green, Huntsville, and Monte Sano mountains. It was named by John Clan Grayson, the first white settler and permanent resident of the area. It is bordered to the south by Owens Cross Roads, Alabama, whose zip code encompasses most of the community known as Big Cove. The northern area of the community, known by locals as the “upper end” is a part of the Brownsboro, Alabama, zip code, and has largely been annexed into the Huntsville City limits.

BLACK CREEK

Skirmish at, near Gadsden, May 2, 1863.

On April 30 at Day’s Gap on Sand Mountain, Forrest caught up with Streight’s expedition and attacked his rear guard. Streight’s men managed to repulse this attack and as a result they continued their march to avoid any further delays and envelopments caused by the Confederate troops. This battle set off a chain of skirmishes and engagements at Crooked Creek (April 30), Hog Mountain (April 30), Blountsville (May 1), Black Creek/Gadsden (May 2), and Blount’s Plantation (May 2). Finally, on May 3, Forrest surrounded Streight’s exhausted men 3 mi east of Cedar Bluff, Alabama, and forced their surrender.

BLAKELY

Skirmish near, April 1, 1865.

BLAKELY FORT

Siege of, April 2-9, 1865.

BLOUNT’S PLANTATION

Action at, May 2, 1863.

BLOUNTSVILLE

Skirmish at, May 1, 1863

May 1 Skirmish, Blountsville ILLINOIS– 80th Infantry.
INDIANA– 51st and 73d Infantry.
OHIO— 3d Infantry.
TENNESSEE–1st Middle Cavalry (2 Cos.).

BLUE POND

Skirmish at, Oct. 20, 1864.

BOLIVAR

Skirmish at, April 28, 1862

Bolivar, also known as Widows, is an unincorporated community in northern Jackson County, Alabama, United States. It is located on Alabama State Route 277, halfway between Bridgeport and Stevenson. It was originally called New Bolivar after many of the citizens of the old community of Bolivar, which was located near the current community of Edgefield near Stevenson, relocated to the railroad well after it was completed through the area in 1854. The old community faded away and New Bolivar never really grew. On original maps from the 1880s, New Bolivar was located where the former North Jackson Hospital stands on Alabama Highway 277.

BON SECOURS RIVER

Expedition from Mobile Bay to, Sept. 9-11, 1864.

BOYD’S STATION

Skirmish near, March 10, 1865.

Skirmishes at, March 15-18, 1865.

BRADDOCK’S FARM

Action at, near Welaka, Fla., Feb. 5, 1865.

BRIDGEPORT

Skirmish at, April 23, 1862.

Skirmish at, April 27, 1862.

Skirmish at, August 27, 1862

Skirmish near, July 29, 1863

Reconnoissance from, toward Trenton, Oct. 20, 1863

Oct. 20 Reconn. from Bridgeport to Trenton ILLINOIS– 82d Infantry.
NEW YORK– 45th and 143d Infantry (Detachments).

Reconnoissance from, to vicinity of Triana, April 12-16, 1864

BROOMTOWN VALLEY

Reconnoissance into, from Winston’s Gap, Sept. 5, 1863

BROWN’S FERRY

Operations about, Feb. 19, 1864

Feb. 19, 1864 Operations about Brown’s Ferry (No Reports.)

BUCKHORN TAVERN

Skirmish at, near New Market, Oct. 12, 1863

Buckhorn Tavern was the site of a skirmish on Oct. 12, 1863. Confederate General Philip D. Roddey’s Alabama Cavalry Brigade was moving south from New Market when it intercepted Union General Robert Mitchell’s Cavalry Brigade, advancing northeast from Huntsville. A brisk firefight broke out, the opposing forces so close they could see each other’s faces by the muzzle flashes. Both sides hesitated to advance in the approaching darkness and heavy rain. The Union troops camped for the night in the woods; the Confederates retired to New Market. The next morning, Roddey’s Brigade rode on to Athens. The Union cavalry did not pursue.

Oct. 12 Skirmish, Buckhorn Tavern PENNSYLVANIA– 9th Cavalry.
TENNESSEE–1st East Cavalry.

CAHAWBA RIVER

(See Fike’s Ferry, April 7, 1865).

CANE CREEK

Skirmish at, Oct. 20, 1863

Oct. 20 Skirmishes, Barton Station, Cane Creek and Dickson’s Station OHIO– 5th Cavalry.
MISSOURI– Landgraeber’s Battery “F,” 2d Light Arty.
UNITED STATES-3d Cavalry.
Union loss, 1 killed, 4 wounded. Total, 4.

Skirmish near, Oct. 26, 1863

Oct. 26 Skirmish, Cane Creek IOWA– 1st Battery Light Arty.; 4th, 9th, 25th, 26th, 31st and 32d Infantry.
MISSOURI– Landgraeber’s Battery “F’,” 2d Light Arty.
OHIO— 5th Cavalry; 4th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.
UNITED STATES–3d Cavalry.
Union loss. 2 killed, 6 wounded. Total, 8.

CANOE STATION

Steele’s column reached, March 27, 1865

CAPERTON’S FERRY

Skirmish at, Aug. 29, 1863

Caperton Ferry is a cultural feature (crossing) in Jackson County. The skirmish was part of the Chickamauga Campaign.

Latitude: 34.8356376
Longitude: -85.8035855
Aug. 29 Skirmish, Caperton’s Ferry ILLINOIS– 25th and 35th Infantry.
KANSAS– 8th Infantry.
WISCONSIN– 15th Infantry.

Scout to, March 28, 1864

March 28 Scouts to Caperton’s Ferry ALABAMA– 1st Cavalry.
KENTUCKY– 2d Cavalry (Detachment).
OHIO– 82d Infantry.

Affair at, March 29, 1864

March 29 Affair, Caperton’s Ferry OHIO– 66th Infantry.

Scout from Bridgeport to, Mar. 31-Apr. 2, 1864

March 3-April 2 Scout from Bridgeport to Caperton’s Ferry. OHIO— 5th Infantry.
PENNSYLVANIA– 28th Infantry.

Scout from Stevenson to, April 11, 1864

CEDAR BLUFF

Skirmish near, May 3, 1863. Scout from Rome, Ga., to, July 28–29, 1864

CENTRE

Skirmish near, May 2, 1863

Scout from Rome, Ga., to, July II-13, 1864

CENTRE STAR

Skirmish at, May 15, 1864.

CENTREVILLE

Skirmish at, April 1, 1865

Skirmish near, April 2, 1865

CHEHAW

Skirmish near, July 18, 1864

CHEROKEE STATION

Skirmish at, Dec. 12, 1862

Skirmish at, April 17, 1863

Skirmishes, Great Bear Creek, Cherokee Station and Lundy’s Lane ALABAMA– 1st Cavalry.
ILLINOIS– 15th Cavalry; Battery “H,” 1st Light Arty.; 7th, 9th (Mounted), 50th and 57th Infantry.
IOWA– 39th Infantry.
MISSOURI– 10th Cavalry; Battery “I,” 1st Light Arty.
OHIO– 81st Infantry.
Union loss, 4 killed, 19 wounded. 59 missing. Total, 82.

Action at, October 21, 1863

Oct. 21 Action, Cherokee Station ILLINOIS– 13th Infantry.
INDIANA– 83d Infantry.
IOWA– 1st Battery Light Arty.; 4th, 9th, 25th, 26th, 30th and 31st Infantry.
MISSOURI– Landgraeber’s Battery “F,” 2d Light Arty.; 3d, 12th, 17th, 27th, 29th, 31st and 32dInfantry.
OHIO— 5th Cavalry; 4th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.: 76th Infantry.
UNITED STATES–3d Cavalry.
Union loss. 7 killed. 28 wounded. Total, 35.

 

Skirmish at, Oct. 29, 1863

Oct. 29 Engagement, Cherokee Station IOWA– 4th, 9th and 31st Infantry.
OHIO— 5th Cavalry.

CHICKASAW

Expedition from Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., to, April 1, 1862

CHICKASAW

Naval reconnoissance to, March 7-12, 1862

Naval action at, Dec. 27, 1864

Reconnoissance from Savannah, Tenn., to, April 3, Isoz

Raid from, to Selma, Ala., and Macon, Ga., Mar. 22 to April 24, 1865. .

CITRONELLE

Surrender of Confederate forces at, May 4, 1865. claibo, Expedition from Blakely to, April 9-17, 1865

CLAYSVILLE

Skirmish at, March 14, 1864

Claysville is an unincorporated community in Marshall County. During the American Civil War, Claysville became a strategic location, due to the ferry crossing of the Tennessee River. A Union Army garrison was located here during the latter part of the war. The 13th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment was stationed here under the command of Colonel William P. Lyon. A post office operated under the name Claysville from 1831 to 1879.

March 14, 1864 Skirmish, Claysville IOWA– 4th and 9th Infantry (Detachments).
MISSOURI– 29th Infantry (Detachment).
Union loss, 1 killed, 2 wounded. 55 missing. Total, 58.

CLEAR SPRING VALLEY

Scout in, July 18-21, 1864

COLUMBUS ROAD

Skirmish on, near Montgomery, April 12, 1865

Skirmish on, near Tuskegee, April 14, 1865

COOSA RIVER

Skirmish near, July 13, 1864

COURTLAND

Skirmish at, July 25, 1862

Expedition from Cornith, Miss., to, April 15-May 8, I803

Affair at, March 8, 1864

March 8, 1864 Affairs at Courtland and Moulton (No Reports.)

Expedition from Decatur to, July 25–28, 1864, and skirmishes.

CRAWFORD

Skirmish at, April 16, 1865

Crawford was almost destroyed in the Civil War. In April of 1865, a Union cavalry force under the command of James Wilson came through the town en route to Columbus, Georgia. Outside of town, it was confronted by a small band of Confederate skirmishers, which it drove back in a short time without loss of life. Members of the 10th Missouri, part of Wilson’s force, had plans to burn the town. They refrained from doing so, however, because of the pleading of a prisoner who had been held in Crawford, who claimed she had received good treatment there. The woman had been imprisoned in Girard on charges of unionism and attempting to steal slaves, but was moved to Crawford because a mob had threatened her life. The only part of the town known to have sustained damage during the encounter was the jail, which was burned.

Source: USACitiesOnline.com

CROOKED CREEK

Action at, April 30, 1863

CROSS ISLAND

At mouth of Cow Creek, Reconnoissance from Stevenson to, Aug. 1863

CURTIS WELLS

Skirmish at, June 24, 1864

DANNELLY’S MILLS

Skirmish near, March 23-24, 1865

DANVo ROAD

Affair on, near Decatur, July 28, Iö04

DAUPHIN ISLAND

Landing of Union forces on, Aug. 3, 1864

Frank Wittenberger Civil War Diary Excerpts

DAVIS GAP

Skirmish near, July 12, 1862. Skirmish at, Sept. 1, 1863

DAY’S GAP

Action at, April 30, 1863

Decato, Occupation of, by Union forces, April 13, ISO2

Expedition from, July 12-16, 1862.

Attack on convalescent train near, Aug 7, 1862

Expedition from Maysville to, Nov. 14-17, 1863

Skirmish at, March 7, 1864

Skirmish near, April 13, 1864

Skirmish near, April 18, 1864

Affair near, April 24, 1864

Skirmish near, April 27, 1864

Skirmish at, April 30, 1864

Skirmish at, May 8, 1864

Expedition from, to . Courtland, July 25–28, 1864, and skirmishes

Affair on Somerville Road near, Aug. 6, 1864

Expedition from, to Moulton, Aug. 17–20, 1864

Demonstrations against, Oct. 26-29, 1864

Skirmishes near, Dec. 27–28, 1864

Skirmish at, March 3, 1865

DECATUR

March 7, 1864 Skirmish, Decatur OHIO– 63d Infantry.

DEER PARK ROAD

Skirmish on, March 25, 1865

DE KALB COUNTY

(See Elrod’s Tan-Yard, Jan. 27, 1865)

DICKSON STATION

Skirmish at, April 19, 1863

ALABAMA– 1st Cavalry.
ILLINOIS– 15th Cavalry; 9th Mounted Infantry.
MISSOURI– 10th Cavalry; Battery “I,” 1st Light Artillery

Skirmish at, April 23, 1863

April 23 Skirmish. Dickson’s Station KANSAS– 7th Cavalry.
MISSOURI– 10th Cavalry.

Skirmish at, Oct. 20, 1863

Oct. 20 Skirmishes, Barton Station, Cane Creek and Dickson’s Station OHIO– 5th Cavalry.
MISSOURI– Landgraeber’s Battery “F,” 2d Light Arty.
UNITED STATES-3d Cavalry.
Union loss, 1 killed, 4 wounded. Total, 4.

DUCKETT’S PLANTATION

Skirmish at, near Paint Rock River, Nov. 19, 1864

EAST BRANCH

Big Warrior River, Skirmish on, May 1, 1863

EBENEzo. CHURCH

Action at, near Maplesville, April 1, 1865

EIGHT-Mo. greer BRIDGE

(See Whistler, April I3, 1865)

ELK RIVER

Operations in the vicinity of, May 1-2, 1862

 

ELROD’S TAN-YARD

Skirmish at, in De Kalb County, Jan. 27, 1865

ELYTON

Skirmish at, March 7, 1865

Skirmish near, March 28, 1865

EVERGREEN

Affair near, March 24, 1865

FEARN’S FERRY

Expedition from Whitesburg to, Feb. 17-18, 1865

FIKE’S roy

Skirmish at, April 7, 1865. (Cahawba Ver. FISH FlyFF. Expedition from Mobile Bay to, Sept. 9-11,I804.

FLETCHER’S FERRY

Skirmish at, May 18, 1864

FLINT RIVER

Affair at, April 17, 1864

FLORENCE

Expedition to, Feb. 6-10, 1862

Affair near, March 25, 1863

Skirmish at, April 23, 1863

April 23 Skirmish, Florence ILLINOIS– 15th Cavalry; 9th Mounted Infantry.
MISSOURI–Battery “H,” 1st Light Arty. (Section).

Expedition from Corinth, Miss., to, May 26-31, 1863

Skirmish near, May 28, 1863

May 28 Action, Florence ILLINOIS– 15th Cavalry; 9th Mounted Infantry.
KANSAS– 7th Cavalry.
MISSOURI– 10th Cavalry.
Union loss. 1 killed, 7 wounded, 10 missing. Total, 18.

Scout from Pulaski, Tenn., to, Dec. 11-17, 1863

Skirmish near, April 12, 1864

Skirmish near, May 7, 1864

Scout from Pulaski, Tenn., to, July 20–25, 1864

Skirmishes at, Oct. 6-7, 1864

Skirmish at Muscle Shoals, or Raccoon Ford, near, Oct. 30, 1864

Skirmish at, Nov. 9, 1864 Expedition from Gravelly Springs to, March 1–6, 1865.

FOWL RIVER NARROWS

Expedition from Dauphin Island, to, March 18–22, 1865, and skirmishes

GADSDEN

Skirmish at Black Creek, near, May 2, 1863

GADSDEN ROAD

Skirmish on, Oct. 25, 1864

GAINES, FORT

Seizure of by State Troops, Jan. 5, 1861

Naval reconnoissance of, Jan. 20, 1864

Jan. 20 Reconn. of Fort Gaines UNITED STATES–Navy.

Investment of, by Union forces, Aug. 3, 1864

Surrender of, Aug. 8, 1864

GIRARD

Skirmish at, April 16, 1865

The Battle of Columbus is also known as the Battle of Girard, Alabama (now Phenix City). The Battle of Columbus, Georgia (April 16, 1865), was the last conflict in the Union campaign through Alabama and Georgia, known as Wilson’s Raid, in the final phase of the American Civil War.Between 1:30 and 2 p.m. on Easter, April 16, 1865, Wilson’s raiders arrived at Girard, and the fighting began. Wilson also sent a detachment north of Columbus to West Point, Georgia, to cross the Chattahoochee River there. West Point was defended by the garrison at Fort Tyler. The Battle of West Point and the Battle of Columbus took place on the same day.

GOSHEN

Skirmish at, Oct. 28, 1864

GOURD, NECK

Expedition from Larkins’s Landing to, March 2-3, 1864

GRAVELY SPRINGS

(Lauderdale County Alabama)

Gravely Springs near Oakland in Lauderdale County was the site of Union General James H. Wilson’s headquarters and camp in the winter of 1865.

Wilson’s 1865 Raid stages at Gravely Springs

GREAT BEAR CREEK

Skirmish at, April 17, 1863

GREENPOINT

Skirmish near, July 14, 1854

GUNTER’S LANDING

Skirmish at, Aug. 24, 1863. Scout from, to Warrenton, July 11, 1864, and skirmish

GUNTERSVILLE

Expedition from Woodville to, July 27-30, 1862

Skirmish at, July 28, 1862

Reconnoissance to, Aug. 5-7, 1862

Scout from Woodville to, and vicinity, Aug. 19-20, 1862

Expedition from Larkins’s Landing to, March 2-3, 1864

March 2-3, 1864 Exp. from Larkins’ Landing to Gourd Neck and Guntersville ALABAMA–Latham’s Co. Cavalry.
ILLINOIS– 55th Infantry.
MICHIGAN– 15th Infantry.
MISSOURI– 8th Infantry.
March 2, 1864 Skirmish, Guntersville MICHIGAN– 15th Infantry.

GURLEY’S TANK

Skirmish near, Feb. 16, 1865.
Halloy

LANDING

See Jackson’s Ferry, May
I2, ISO4).

HARRISON’S GAP

Affair at, April 21, 1864

HILLSBOROUGH

Skirmish at, Dec. 29, 1864.

HOG JAW VALLE

(See Ladd’s House, Feb. 3-4, 1865).

HOG MOUNTAIN

Action at, April 30, 1863.

HUGER, ox.

Bombardment and capture of, April 9-II, I865

HUNTSVILLE

Skirmish at, Sept. 26, 1863

HUNToyo Occupation of, by Union forces, April II, I802

Skirmishes at, June 4-5, 1862

Skirmish at, July 2, 1862

Skirmish at, Aug. 31-Sept. 1, 1862

Expedition to, July 13–22, 1863

July 18-22 Expedition to Huntsville ILLINOIS— Chicago Board of Trade Battery Light Arty.
INDIANA– 2d, 3d and 4th Cavalry.
IOWA– 5th Cavalry.
KENTUCKY– 2d, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th Cavalry.
MICHIGAN– 2d and 4th Cavalry.
OHIO– 1st, 3d, 4th and 10th Cavalry; Battery “D,” 1st Light Arty.
PENNSYLVANIA– 7th and 9th Cavalry.
TENNESSEE– 2d and 5th Cavalry.
WISCONSIN– 1st Cavalry.
UNITED STATES–4th Cavalry.

Skirmish near, Oct. 1, 1864

Skirmish near, Oct. 18, 1864

ISABELLA, SLOOP

Seizure of, at Mobile, March 20, 1861

JACKSON’S FERRY

(Hallowell’s Landing), Skirmish at, May 12, 1864

Jackso; Expedition from Rome, Ga., to, Aug. – II-I5, 1864

JONESBOROUGH

Action near, July 26, 1862

KELLY’S PLANTATION

Affair near, April 11, 1864

KING’S HILL

Skirmish at, Oct. 23, 1864

KING’S STORE

Skirmish at, April 6, 1865

LADD’S HOUSE (Hog Jaw Valley)

Skirmish at, Feb. 3-4, 1865. .

LADIGA

Skirmish at, Oct. 28, 1864.

LAMB’S FERRY

(Lauderdale County Alabama)

Skirmish at, May 10, 1862

Skirmish at, May 14, 1862

SKIRMISH AT LAMB’S FERRY

LANIER’S MILL

(Sipsey Creek), Skirmish near, April 6, 1865

LARKINS’ LANDING

Larkin Landing (historical) is a cultural feature (locale) in Jackson County.

March 2-3, 1864 Exp. from Larkins’ Landing to Gourd Neck and Guntersville ALABAMA–Latham’s Co. Cavalry.
ILLINOIS– 55th Infantry.
MICHIGAN– 15th Infantry.
MISSOURI– 8th Infantry.
March 2 Skirmish, Guntersville MICHIGAN– 15th Infantry.

LARKINSVILLE

Skirmish near, Aug. 30, 1862

Skirmish near, Sept. 26, 1863

Sept. 26 Action, Hunt’s Mills, near Larkinsville ALABAMA and TENNESSEE–1st Vidette Cavalry.

Affair near, Feb. 14, 1864

Feb. 14, 1864 Affair at Larkinsville TENNESSEE and ALAMAMA– Vidette Cavalry (Detachment).

LAWRENCE COUNTY

Scout in, July, 1864

LAW’S LANDING

Skirmish at, July 28, 1862

LEBANON

Skirmish at, Sept. 5, 1863

Sept. 5 Skirmish, Lebanon TENNESSEE–1st Cavalry.

LEESBURG

Skirmish at, Oct. 21, 1864

LEIGHTON

Skirmish at, April 23, 1863

Skirmish near, Dec. 30, 1864

LIMESTONE BRIDGE

Operations in the vicinity of, May 1-2, 1862

LITTLE BEAR CREEK

Skirmish at, Dec. 12, 1862

Skirmish at, Oct. 27, 1863

Oct. 27 Engagement, Little Bear Creek, Tuscumbia ILLINOIS–Batteries “A,” “B” and “H,” 1st Light Arty.; 13th, 55th, 116th and 127th Infantry.
INDIANA– 83d Infantry
IOWA– 1st Battery Light Arty.; 4th, 9th, 25th, 26th, 31st and 32d Infantry.
MISSOURI– Landgraeber’s Battery “F,” 2d Light Arty.; 3d, 6th, 8th, 12th, 17th, 27th, 29th, 31st and 32d Infantry.
OHIO— 5th Cavalry: 4th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 30th, 37th, 47th, 54th, 57th and 76th Infantry.
WEST VIRGINIA– 4th Infantry.
UNITED STATES–3d Cavalry; 13th Infantry.

LITTLE RIVER

Skirmish at, Oct. 20, 1864

LOWNDESBOROUGH

Skirmish at, April 10, 1865

LUNDY’S LANE

Action at, April 17, 1863

MADISON COUNTY

Operations in, Aug. 12-14, 1864

MADISON STATION

Affair at, May 17, 1864

MAPLESVILLE

Action near, April 1, 1865

MARION COUNTY

Operations against Unionists in, April 19, 1864

MAYSVILLE

Skirmish at, Aug. 21, 1863

Aug. 21 Skirmish, Maysville KENTUCKY– 4th Cavalry.

Skirmish at, Oct. 13, 1863

Oct. 13 Skirmish, Maysville WISCONSIN– 1st Cavalry.

Skirmish at, Nov. 4, 1863

Nov. 4 Skirmish, Maysville OHIO– 4th Cavalry.

Skirmish near, Nov. 17, 1864

Scout from Huntsville to, April 5–7, 1865

MOBILE

Operations about, Feb. 16-March 27, 1864

Feb. 16-March 17, 1864 Operations about Mobile UNITED STATES–Navy.

Seizure of the sloop Isabella at, March 20, 1861

Evacuation of, by Confederate forces, April 11, 1865

Occupation of, by Union forces, April 12, 1865

Explosion of ordnance depot at, May 25, 1865

Campaign, March 17 to May 4, 1865

MOBILE BAY

Naval reconnoissance of Forts Morgan and Gaines, Jan. 20, 1864

Jan. 20 Reconn. of Mobile UNITED STATES-Navy.

Operations in, Aug. 2-23, 1864

Capture of C. S. Selma in, Aug. 5, 1864

Boat reconnoissance into, July 6, 1864

Naval engagement in, Dec. 24, 1861

Naval battle of, Aug. 5, 1864

Naval reconnoissance in, Aug. 15, 1864

Attack on U. S. S. Sebago in, Oct. 9, 1864

Attack on U. S. S. Octoraro in, Jan. 28, 1865

MONTEVALLO

Skirmish at, March 30, 1865

Action near, March 31, 1865

Montgogy

Occupation of, by Union forces, April I2, I865

MONTPELIER SPRINGS

Skirmish at, April 20, 1865

MOORESVILLE

Operations in the vicinity of, May 1-2,

1862

MORGAN, FORT

Seizure of, by State Troops, Jan. 5, 1861

Atton blockade runner under the guns of, Oct. 12, I803

Naval reconnoissance of, Jan. 20, 1864

Capture of Confederate picket near, July 22, 1864

Passage of, by the Union fleet, and engagement in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864

Siege of, August 9-22, 1864

Bonoment of, by Union naval forces, Aug. 22-23, I804

Surrender of (by Confederate forces), Aug. 23, 1864

MOULTON

Affair at, March 8, 1864

March 8, 1864 Affairs at Courtland and Moulton (No Reports.)

Skirmish near, March 21, 1864

May 29, 1864

There were several fights in the area, the most significant being described in the Official Records as an action on May 29, 1864. About 2,500 soldiers were involved, almost equally divided between the two sides. The Confederates, led by Brig. Gen. Philip D. Roddey, included the 4th (Roddey’s), 5th and 10th Alabama Cavalry Regiments, Nixon’s 22nd Tennessee Cavalry, Stuart’s, Williams’ and Warren’s Alabama Cavalry Battalions and Ferrell’s Georgia Battery. Federal forces under Col. Eli Long included the 1st, 3rd and 4th Ohio Cavalry Regiments.

Here are parts of three reports about the fighting:

Report of Col. Eli Long, commanding cavalry brigade, U.S. Army:

Near Moulton, Ala., I was attacked at 4 a.m. by General Roddey with cavalry and four pieces of artillery. After a severe engagement, lasting two hours, the enemy was completely repulsed on all sides, and compelled to retreat in great disorder toward Moulton, leaving his dead and some wounded on the field. Roddey’s loss was 12 to 15 killed; the number of his wounded not known. We took 16 prisoners, including 1 lieutenant-colonel and 2 lieutenants. Our own casualties were 3 killed and 14 wounded. Marched that morning at 8 o’clock, passing through Somerville. Ala., and on the 30th of May overtook the Seventeenth Army Corps, Major-General Blair.
Report of Col. Charles B. Seidel, 3rd Ohio Cavalry, U.S. Army:

Marched through Moulton, toward Somerville, and camped three miles beyond, and were attacked in our camp at 4 a.m., 29th, by Confederate force under General Roddey. After an hour and a half of fighting we drove them, aiding to capture 2 field officers, 4 line officers, and a number of enlisted men. The enemy retired to Moulton, leaving 11 killed on the field.
Report of Col. Josiah Patterson, 5th Alabama Cavalry, commanding brigade.

General Roddey succeeded in concentrating his forces at Moulton, and this morning at daylight attacked the enemy. A desperate engagement ensued, which lasted for three hours. We at first drove the enemy a mile and a half, and were still driving them, when we were forced to leave the field for want of ammunition. The ammunition for our artillery was completely exhausted, and many of the men were without a cartridge. We fell back three miles. The command is now being supplied with ammunition, and as soon as we can cook rations we will move in pursuit of the enemy, who are going toward Rome, Ga. Their force consists of the Seventeenth Army Corps and one division of cavalry. My scouts have been all through them. They have about 5,000, and from 3,500 to 4,000 cavalry, making in all a force of 9,000 men. They have a very heavy train, evidently loaded with supplies. The number of wagons is estimated at from 300 to 400. Their cavalry is well supplied with pack-mules. They will, necessarily, with so large a train, move slowly. Our horses and men are already very tired, as the command has been marching and fighting for several days. We have lost some of the most valuable officers in our command.

 

MOULTON

Action at, May 29, 1864

Expedition from Decatur to, Aug. 17-20, 1864

MOUNT PLEASANT

Skirmish near, April 11, 1865

MOUNT VERNON ARSENAL

Seizure of, by State Troops, Jan. 4, 1861

MUDDY CREEK

Skirmish at, March 26, 1865

MUNFORD’S STATION

Action at, April 23, 1865

MUSCLE SHOALS

(See Florence, Oct. 30, 1864

NASH VILLE

Expedition from Decherd, Tenn., to, Aug.5-9, 1863

NEAL’S GAP

Skirmish at, Sept. 1, 1863. Skirmish at, Sept. 17, 1863

NEW MARKET

Skirmish near, Aug. 5, 1862

Skirmish near, Oct. 12, 1863

Skirmish near, Nov. 17, 1864

Scout from Huntsville to, April 5–7, 1865

Expedition from Pulaski, Tenn., to, May 5-13, 1865

NEW PORT BRIDGE

March 5-6, 1865 Skirmishes, Newport Bridge FLORIDA– 2d Cavalry.
UNITED STATES– 2d and 99th Colored Infantry.

NORTHPORT

Action at, April 3, 1865

OLD DEPOSIT FERRY

Skirmish at, July 29, 1862

OPELIKA

Skirmish near, April 16, 1865

PAINT ROCK

Skirmish at, Jan. 26, 1865

PAINT ROCK BRIDGE

Skirmish at, April 28, 1862

Skirmish at, April 8, 1864

Skirmish near, Dec. 7, 1864

Affair at, Dec. 31, 1864

PAINT ROCK RIVER

Skirmish near, Nov. 19, 1864

PAINT ROCK STATION

Skirmish at, July 30, 1864

PETER’S BLUFF

Naval action at, Sept. 11, 1864

PLANTERSVILLE

Skirmish at, April 1, 1865

POLLARD

Expedition from Barrancas, Fla., toward, July 21–25, 1864

Expedition from Barrancas, Fla., to, Dec. 13-19, 1864, and skirmishes

Occupation of, by Union forces, Mar. 26, 1865

POND SPRINGS

Skirmish at, May 27, 1864

Affair at, June 29, 1864

Skirmish at, Dec. 29, 1864

PORT DEPOSIT

Skirmish near, Aug. 24, 1863

POWELL, FORT

Evacuation of, by Confederate forces, Aug. 5, 1864

RACCOON FORD

(See Florence, Oct. 30, 1864)

RANDOLPH

Skirmish near, April 1, 1865

Rawlingsville

Destruction of salt-works near, Sept. 5, 1863

Sept. 5 Affairs, Rawlingsville MICHIGAN– 2d Cavalry.
PENNSYLVANIA– 9th Cavalry.
TENNESSEE– 1st Cavalry. (Destruction of Salt Works.)

ROCK CUT

Action at, April 22, 1863

Action, Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia ALABAMA– 1st Cavalry.
ILLINOIS– 15th Cavalry; Battery “H,” 1st Light Arty.; 7th, 9th (Mounted), 12th, 50th, 52d, 57thand 122d Infantry.
INDIANA– 66th Infantry.
IOWA– 39th Infantry.
MICHIGAN–Battery “C,” 1st Light Arty.
KANSAS– 7th Cavalry.
MISSOURI– 10th Cavalry; Batteries “D,” “H” and “I,” 1st Light Arty.
OHIO– 27th, 39th, 43d, 63d and 81st Infantry.

RODDEY’S RAID

(See Wheeler and Roddey’s Raid, Sept. 30–Oct. 17, 1863)

ROGERSVILLE

Occupation of, May 13-14, 1862

Scout from Pulaski, Tenn., to, April 23-26, 1865

 

ROSECRANS’S COMMUNICATIONS, Raid on, Sept.
30–Oct. 17, 1863

ROUND MOUNTAIN

Skirmish near, Oct. 25, 1864

RUSSELLVILLE

Skirmish near, July 3, 1862

Skirmish at, Dec. 31, 1864

Expedition from Eastport, Miss., to, Feb. 19-23, 1865

Sand Mountain, Action at, April 30, 1863

Skirmish at, Dec. 26, 1863

SAND MOUNTAIN

Dec. 26 Skirmish, Sand Mountain ALABAMA and TENNESSEE— 1st Vidette Cavalry.

Scottsboro

Jan. 25-Feb. 5 Exp. from Scottsboro toward Rome, Ga ALABAMA– 1st Cavalry.
ILLINOIS–Batteries “A” and “H,” 1st Light Arty.; 55th and 116th Infantry.
IOWA– 25th Infantry.
MICHIGAN– 15th Infantry.
MISSOURI– 3d, 6th, 12th, 17th and 32d Infantry.
OHIO—- 5th Cavalry; 47th and 54th Infantry.

SCOTTSVILLE

Skirmish near, April 2, 1865

SEBAGO, U. S. S., Attack on, in Mobile Bay, Oct. 9, 1864

SELMA, C. S. S., Capture of, in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864

SELMA

Raid from Chickasaw to, March 22-April 24, 1865

SHOAL CREEK

Skirmish at, Jan. 14, 1864

Jan. 14 Skirmish. Shoal Creek TENNESSEE— 2d Mounted Infantry.

Skirmish near, Oct. 31, 1864

Skirmishes at, Nov. 5-6, 1864

Skirmish at, Nov. 9, 1864

Skirmish at, Nov. II, 1864

Skirmishes on the line of, Nov. 16-20, 1864

SINK SPRING VALLEY

Scout in, July 18–21, 1864

SIPSEY CREEK

(See Lanier’s Mills, April 6, 1865)

SIX-MILE CREEK

Action at, March 31, 1865

SOMERVILLE

Scout from Triana to, July 29, 1864

SOMERVILLE ROAD

Affair on, Aug. 6, 1864

SPANGLER’S MILL

Action near, July 26, 1862

SPANISH FORT

Skirmish near, March 26, 1865

Siege of, March 27-April 8, 1865

STEVENSON

Skirmish at, July 28, 1862

Skirmish at, Aug. 31, 1862

Skirmish at, Sept. 7, 1863

Sept. 7 Skirmish, Stevenson PENNSYLVANIA– 9th Cavalry.

Scout from, to Caperton’s Ferry and vicinity, April 11, 1864

STEVENSON’S GAP

Skirmishes at, March 15-18, 1865

STOCKTON

Steele’s column reached, March 31, 1865. Scout from near Blakely toward, April 7, 1865

STREIGHT’S RAID

from Tuscumbia, Ala., toward Rome, Ga., April 26-May 3, 1863

SULPHUR BRANCH TRESTLE

Action at, and surrender of, Sept. 25, 1864

SULPHUR SPRINGS ROA

(See Kelly’s Plantation, April 11, 1864)

SUMMERFIELD

Skirmish at, April 2, 1865

SWEETWATER

Jan. 25, 1864 Action, Sweetwater ILLINOIS– 92d Mounted Infantry.

TALLADEGA

Occupation of, by Union troops, April 22,

1865

TAP’S GAP

Skirmish at, Sept. 1, 1863

TECUMSEH, U. S. S., Sunk near Fort Morgan, Aug. 5, 1864

TEN ISLAND FORD

Skirmish at, July 14, 1864. TENNESSEE, C. S. S., Capture of, in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.

 

TENNESSEE RIVER

Reconnoissance down, April 12-16, 1864

THORN HILL

Skirmish near, Jan. 4, 1865

TOWN CREEK

Skirmish at, April 6, 1863

Skirmish at, April 27, 1863

Action at, April 28, 1863

TRACY, BATTERY

Bombardment and capture of, April 9-11, 1865

TRENTON

Reconnoissance from Bridgeport toward, Oct. 20, 1863

TRIANA

Reconnoissance from Bridgeport to the vicinity of, April 12-16, 1864

Scout from, to Somerville, July 29, 1864

TRINITY

Skirmishes at and near, July 25, 1862

Skirmish at, Aug. 22, 1862

Affair near, Aug. 23, 1862

TRION

Skirmish at, April 1, 1865

TURKEYTOWN

Skirmish at, Oct. 25, 1864

TUSCALOOSA

Action near, April 3, 1865

Occupation of, by Union forces, April 4, 1865

TUSCUMBIA

Occupation of, by Union forces, April 16, Ioo2

Skirmishes at, April 24-25, 1862

Reconnoissance from Corinth, Miss., toward, Dec. 9-14, I&O2.

Attack on, Feb. 22, 1863

Skirmish at, April 23, 1863

Raid from, toward Rome, Ga., April 26-May 3, 1863

Skirmishes at, Oct. 24-25, 1863

Oct. 24-25 Skirmishes, Tuscumbia and Barton Station. ILLINOIS– 13th Infantry.
MISSOURI– 3d, 12th, 17th, 27th, 29th, 31st and 32d Infantry.
OHIO– 76th Infantry.

Skirmishes near, Feb. 20, 1865

TUSKEGEE

Skirmish near, April 14, 1865

UNION SPRINGS

Expedition from Blakely to, April 17 30, 1865

VALHERMOSO SPRINGS

Scout from Triana to, Aug. 15, 1864.

VIENNA

Skirmish near, July 8, 1864

Scout from Huntsville to near, April 3-4, 1865

WARRENTON

Scout from Gunter’s Landing to, July 11, 1864, and skirmish

WATERLOO

Skirmish at, Feb. 12, 1865

WATKINS PLANTATION

Affair near, July 31, 1864

WEATHERFORD

Steele’s column reached, March 29, 1865

WEST BRIDGE

Action at, April 29, 1862

WETUMPKA

Skirmish at, April 13, 1865

Skirmish at, May 4, 1865

WHEELER AND RODDEY’S RAID on Rosecrans’s communications, Sept. 30–Oct. 17, 1863.

WHISTLER

(or Eight-Mile Creek Bridge), Skirmish at,pril 13, 1865.

WHITESBURG

Skirmish at, May 29, 1862

Expedition from Maysville to, Nov. 14-17, 1863

Operations about, Feb. 2, 1864

Expedition from, to Fearn’s Ferry, Feb. 17-18, 1865

WILL’S CREEK

Skirmish at, Sept. 1, 1863

WILL’S VALLEY

Skirmish in, Aug. 31, 1863

WILSON’S RAID from Chickasaw to Selma, Ala., and Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24, 1865

WINSTON’S GAP

Reconnoissance from, into Broomtown Valley, Sept. 5, 1863

Skirmish at, Sept. 8, 1863

Sept. 8 Skirmish, Winston’s Gap (No Reports.)

WOODALL’S BRIDGE

Skirmish at, April 7, 1864

An estimated 600 Confederate and Union troops skirmished on this site on April 7, 1864 for control of crucial troop movements south of the Tennessee River during the Federal occupation of North Alabama.

Confederate Brigadier General James Holt Clanton led forces based in Danville against a Federal cavalry from the garrison at Decatur for control of Woodall’s Bridge.

The bridge was the primary route for east-west movement in Morgan County after an important river bridge at Decatur was burned two years earlier. Troops needed access to Woodall’s Bridge to move across the county and defend their picket positions.

The Confederate strength was initially 40 men, with another 200 becoming engaged. The Union forces were estimated at 350 men. The Confederates chased the Union cavalry back to Decatur after the skirmish.

The next day smaller cavalry units of both forces skirmished on this site with the Confederates again chasing the Union forces back towards Decatur.

Attack on Union pickets near, Aug. 4, IS02

Reconnoissance from, to Guntersville, Aug. 5–7, 1862. Affair near, Jan. 23, 1864

Scout from, March 30, 1864

WOODVILLE

Jan. 23 Affair, Woodville (No Reports.)

 

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