Mobile-Alabama

Mobile Alabama

Mobile Alabama began as the first capital of colonial French Louisiana in 1702. During its first 100 years, Mobile was a colony of France, then Britain, and lastly Spain. Mobile first became a part of the United States of America in 1813, with the annexation of West Florida under President James Madison. In 1861, Alabama joined the Confederate States of America, which surrendered in 1865.

Betty’s Berry Farm – Blueberries, Blackberries

Betty’s Berry Farm
Blueberries, Blackberries
3887 Driskell Loop Road
Wilmer, AL 36587
Phone: 251-649-1711
Email: bettysberryfarm@aol.com

Open: In season,  7 days a week, Self serve 6 am to 10 pm from May 15 to July 15. Directions: Hwy 98 West to Wilmer, AL. Turn left on Wilmer Road, to 1st paved road on right (4mi) to Howell’s Ferry, turn right , go 1 mile & take 1st left onto Driskell Loop Road. Farm is on corner- Driveway is from Driskell Loop. Prices: in 2011 were $1.50 per lb.  There is a $5.00 minimum charge for customers over 6 years of age.

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama
May 4, 1865
Citronelle, Alabama

At the wars end Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor held command of the administrative entity called the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, with some 12,000 troops. Mobile, Alabama had fallen to Union forces in April of 1865 and Taylor had received news of General Johnston’s surrender to Union General Sherman. Taylor agreed to meet Union Major General E.R.S. Canby for a conference a few miles north of Mobile at Magee Farm, in the town of Kushla, on April 30th at which time they established a truce, terminable after 48 hours notice by either party. The Confederate general arrived at Magee Farm on a handcar propelled by two African Americans. A single officer, Colonel William Levy, accompanied them. General Canby, on the other hand, reached the meeting place accompanied by his staff in dress uniforms, a full brigade of Union troops and a military band. The two generals met 20 miles further north at Citronelle in Mobile County on May 4, 1865.

CSS Jamestown (1861 - 1862) | Also known as Thomas Jefferson

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero

 
Obituary Notice for Thomas L. Harrison
At Mobile, Thomas L. Harrison, the hero on the confederate side in the Battle of Mobile Bay, died Friday night, aged fifty-one years.  He graduated from Annapolis, and at the age of twenty years, he entered the confederate naval service. He was ordered to Mobile in 1862 and appointed executive office for the gunboat Morgan.  

In the battle in the spring of 1865, when Farragut forced an entrance into Mobile Bay, the little vessel was soon driven under the shelter of the guns of Fort Morgan, the ram

 

Tennessee and the gunboat Selma having been captured and the gunboat Gaines burned.  

The captain of the Morgan gave orders to abandon the ship and set her on fire.  Lieutenant Harrison, however, reminding the crew that this was the only free vessel in the bay and would be of incalculable value to the confederacy if saved, asked the men to volunteer to run the boat up to Mobile.  Every man stepped to the starboard. Thereupon Harrison requested the captain to step below.

David Wayne Trippe

David Wayne Trippe

Give A Little Credit Where Credit Is Due
David Wayne Trippe

Up and coming Singer/Songwriter David Wayne Trippe has been involved in Live Performance since 1976. Over the years, he has worked with companies such as Tate Publishing, Giant Records and Integrity Music. He has recorded with David Huff (David and the Giants) and Steve Grisham (The Outlaws) and has shared the stage with Whitecross, New Song, Russ Taff, David and the Giants, Phil Driscol, Lulu, Rusty Goodman and other legends of Gospel and Inspirational Music. He has written or co-written several Christian Songs that have received Radio airplay with success. He began to try his hand at writing Country Songs in 2003, in which several were forwarded to Established Artist.

www.bayouboatbuilders.com

Bayou La Batre Alabama: Seafood Capital of Alabama

Bayou La Batre Alabama
Bayou La Batre, Alabama is a fishing village with a seafood-processing harbor for fishing boats  and shrimp boats. The local Chamber of Commerce has described the city as the “Seafood Capital of Alabama” for packaging seafood from hundreds of fishing boats. Bayou La Batre was the first permanent settlement on the south Mobile County mainland and was founded in 1786, when French-born  Joseph Bouzage (Bosarge) [1733-1795] was awarded a 1,259-acre Spanish land grant on the West Bank of the bayou. The modern City of Bayou La Batre was incorporated in 1955. Born in Poitiers, France, Joseph Bouzage came to the Gulf Coast circa 1760, married Catherine Louise Baudreau (Boudreau) on June 5, 1762, and was the father of seven children, including one son, Jean Baptiste. Bayou La Batre was featured in the 1994 film Forrest Gump and the book upon which it is based.

Fort Gaines Dauphin Island Alabama photo by Edibobb

Fort Gaines

Fort Gaines is an historic fort on Dauphin Island, Alabama, United States. It is best known for its role in the Battle of Mobile Bay during the American Civil War.  

 

 

Exhibits include the huge anchor from the USS Hartford, Admiral David Farragut’s flagship on which he gave his world famous command, “Damn the torpedoes – full speed ahead!”  

 

 

 

 

The fort also has the original cannons used in the battle, five pre-Civil War brick buildings in the interior courtyard, operational blacksmith shop and kitchens, tunnel systems to the fortified corner bastions, and similar features. A museum details the history of this period, as well as the French colonial presence beginning in the late 17th century.