THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: Chapter V

Col. Steadman at once began a strict system of discipline and drill. The following was the order of the day: Reveille at daybreak with roll-call, inspection of arms and policing of camps; 6 a. m., drill in the school of the soldier; 7 A. M., breakfast; 8.30 a. m., guard mounting; 9 A. m., non-commissioned officers’ drill; 10 a. m., drill in the school of the company; 12 m., dinner; 1 p. m., skirmish drill; 3 p. m., battalion drill; 5 p. m., dress parade; sunset, retreat; 9 P.M., taps.

The photograph is of Camp Butler in August 1861. The original is in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: Chapter III

The feeling between the prisoners and guards was not very friendly, and the former delighted in keeping the latter in fear of an outbreak.

Company K First Alabama Regiment – THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE CHAPTER VI

The enemy made no more general assaults upon the works until June 14th, but in the meantime were approaching by parallels and planting batteries of heavy siege and naval guns. A steady fire was kept up day and night both by the fleet and the land batteries. There were about eighty siege pieces in these latter. An eight-inch howitzer so planted as to enfilade a portion of the southern line of defences, caused much amusement as well as annoyance to the Confederates.

Siege and surrender of port Hudsonthe investment-SKIRMISHING-THE FIRST GRAND ASSAULT

ASSAILED AND ASSAILANTS-DOUBLY ARMED-LIEUT.

PRATT AT BATTERY II-THE ESSEX DRIVEN OFF-

LIEUT. ADAMS ELECTED-ARTILLERY PRACTICE-AS SAULT OF JUNE I4TH-EFFECT OF BUCK AND BALL-

BANKS INHUMANITY-LEAD FOR WATER-A GALLANT

CORPORAL-BATTERY I I SILENCED-GALLANT SCHUR-

MURS DEATH-THE SUNKEN BATTERY-MULE AND

PEAS-THE FALL OF VICKSBURG-UNCONDITIONAL

SURRENDER-GEN. GARDNERS SWORD-CASUALTIES

OF THE FIRST.

THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: Chapter 1

Fresh beef was hauled off and buried by the wagon load; barrels of corned beef remained untouched in the camp; while rice, flour, molasses and sugar were issued in larger quantities than could possibly be eaten. These were the last days of the “ Flush times of the First Alabama.”

Contemporary Newspaper view of the Union fleet passing Port Hudson published by Harper's Weekly Newspaper April 18, 1863.

Company K First Alabama Regiment – THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE CHAPTER VII

During the negotiations for the surrender, Gen. Banks refused to grant terms permitting the release of the prisoners on parole, on the ground that orders from Washington positively forbade it. On the day of surrender, however, he suddenly changed his mind and decided to parole all enlisted men, retaining the officers.

THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: CHAPTER II

The batteries, which had been ably planned, but imperfectly constructed, under direction of Capt. Harris, of the Engineer Corps, contained forty-four guns, mostly 32 and 42 pound smooth-bores, with a few 64-pounders and one or two 100-pound rifles.