Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements

Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements
Abihka was an Upper Creek Indian town east of the Coosa River and south of Tallassehatchee Creek. The first record of the town is found on Delisle’s map of 1704, where they are “les Abelkas,” and are noted on the east side of the Coosa River, apparently just above the influx of the Pakantalahassi.— Winsor. Abikakutchee
Abikakutchee was another Upper Creek Indian town located in Talladega County. The site was first recorded on maps in 1733 and a census in 1760 listed 130 Indian warriors living there. Those living there were later reported to have a few cattle, hogs and horses and to assist the white people who lived among them.

Alabama RV Campgrounds

Digital Alabama Guide to
Alabama RV Campgrounds
A~Okay RV Park
Dothan, AL
Quiet country setting, yet just 3 miles from town. Large lots for plenty of parking. Access to a 5 acre spring fed pond. Can accommodate RV’s up to 70ft, BIG RIG FRIENDLY, 20/30/50 amp, back-ins, pull thrus, full hookups, fishing, hiking, propane sales available and RV storage. Canoes and small boats welcome.

Hudson House

Hudson House Alabama

Located on Watts Mill Road in Ashland, Alabama, the Oxford Paranormal Society affirms paranormal activity in the home built in 1905. Hudson House Ashland Alabama Directions

Additional Tales About The Hudson House
An Old Soul In a New Life
Hudson House Folklore
13 Most Haunted Places In Alabama

Ghost hunter Robert Simone say this "orb" is evidence of the paranormal.

Sweetwater Mansion

Sweetwater Mansion
Sweetwater Mansion History
Sweetwater  Mansion (also known as the Governor Robert Patton House), located in Florence, Alabama, is a plantation house designed by General John Brahan of the Alabama Militia. A veteran of the War of 1812, Brahan owned more than 4,000 acres in eastern Lauderdale County, Alabama. The eight room home was built of bricks manufactured on the site of Sweetwater Creek which lay just below the house. Sweetwater Mansion received its name from the creek and was first occupied by Brahan’s son-in-law Robert M. Patton, a post-Civil War governor of Alabama, who completed the mansion in 1835. 

The mansion’s basement once served as a Civil War hospital and had also been a county jail. There are rumours of someone who once lived in one of the room upstairs who practiced dark magic but many believe this to be untrue.