Safe House Museum

The Safe House Museum

 

The Safe House Museum is located in the city of Greensboro, Alabama, in Hale County Alabama

Martin Luther King Jr. spent the night of March 21, 1968 in this house while fleeing the Klan. The house is now a museum highlighting the struggle for equality by African-Americans in Alabama. Its curator, Ms. Theresa Burroughs, was a foot soldier in the Civil Rights Movement and a family friend of King. Greensboro is also home to a large number of antebellum-era houses and churches, including some that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places such as Glencairn and Magnolia Grove. www.ruralswalabama.org states:
On the night of March 21, 1968, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. sought refuge from the Ku Klux Klan inside a small, shotgun-style home in the depot neighborhood of Greensboro, AL.

Alston-Cobb House in Grove Hill, Clarke County, Alabama

Alston-Cobb House

Grove Hill was the site of one of the worst massacres of the Creek War of 1813-14. According to Christopher Maloney on the Encyclopedia of Alabama, it was the only fort attacked during the conflict.

Oakville Indian Mounds

Oakville Indian Mounds Park and Museum

The Oakville Indian Mounds Park and Museum is an 83-acre state park dedicated to ancient Native American monuments and the historic Cherokee nation of the Southeast. It preserves twenty 2,000-year-old mounds built by Middle Woodland-era (1-500 CE) prehistoric indigenous peoples. The state museum is designed in the style of a Cherokee council house, as these were the dominant indigenous people of the area at the time of European encounter. It provides exhibits on the Copena culture, displaying more than 1000 archeological artifacts that were excavated on site. It also includes material on the historic Cherokee nation, whose people had migrated to the area and inhabited it by the time of European encounter in the 17th century.

Gulf Shores Museum | 244 W. 19th Ave | Gulf Shores AL 36542

Gulf Shores Museum

The Gulf Shores Museum houses artifacts from the city’s history and it also tells the story of the entire region’s past as well. But the story of the Gulf Shores Museum does not stop with the contents of the building. Thanks to the Oyster Bay Baptist Church, there is plenty to see outside in the backyard of the Gulf Shores Museum as well.
Explore new and permanent exhibits as well as seasonal programs and events. Admission is free to the public.

Fort Gaines Dauphin Island Alabama photo by Edibobb

Fort Gaines

Fort Gaines is an historic fort on Dauphin Island, Alabama, United States. It is best known for its role in the Battle of Mobile Bay during the American Civil War.  

 

 

Exhibits include the huge anchor from the USS Hartford, Admiral David Farragut’s flagship on which he gave his world famous command, “Damn the torpedoes – full speed ahead!”  

 

 

 

 

The fort also has the original cannons used in the battle, five pre-Civil War brick buildings in the interior courtyard, operational blacksmith shop and kitchens, tunnel systems to the fortified corner bastions, and similar features. A museum details the history of this period, as well as the French colonial presence beginning in the late 17th century.