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Madison Alabama

Today, Madison is one of the fastest growing cities in the southeastern United States, with one of the highest per capita incomes and a school system that is recognized for scholastic excellence at the local, state, and national level.

The Mayor and the City Council continue to invest in economic development, public facilities, and infrastructure.

Madison has been listed as a US News & World Report “Top 10 Places to Grow Up”, a CNN Money “Top 100 Best Places to Live”, one of Family Circle’s “10 Best Towns for Family”, and was recognized as Google’s “2013 Digital Capital of Alabama”.

Alston-Cobb House in Grove Hill, Clarke County, Alabama

Alston-Cobb House

Grove Hill was the site of one of the worst massacres of the Creek War of 1813-14. According to Christopher Maloney on the Encyclopedia of Alabama, it was the only fort attacked during the conflict.

The Dog Charge At Fort Sinquifield

Fort Sinquefield

Fort Sinquefield is the historic site of a wooden stockade fortification in Clarke County, Alabama, near the modern town of Grove Hill. It was built by early Clarke County pioneers as protection during the Creek War and was attacked in 1813 by Creek warriors. A marker was erected at the site by Clarke County school children in 1931 and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 31, 1974. At the time of the Creek War, originally a civil war within the Creek nation, Clarke was a newly formed county in the Mississippi Territory. The Creek were divided between traditionalists in the Upper Towns and those who had adopted more European-American customs in the Lower Towns.

Battery Duportail located inside Fort Morgan Alabama

Battery Duportail

Battery Duportail
Credits:

Content is available under Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike. http://fortwiki.com/Battery_Duportail

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE

BATTLEFIELDS AND FORTS MAIN PAGE
ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail was a reinforced concrete, Endicott Period 12 inch coastal gun battery on Fort Morgan , Baldwin County, Alabama. The battery was named in G.O. 78, 15 May 1903 after Maj. Gen. Louis L. Duportail, Chief of Engineers (1777-1783), Continental Army, who served with distinction during the Revolutionary War and who died at sea in 1802 while en route to France. Battery construction started in 1898, was completed in 1900 and transferred to the Coast Artillery for use 3 Jun 1900 at a cost of $ 172,646.05.

Early Forts of Alabama Map

Ft Hampton, Camp Coffee, Ft Deposit, Ft Armstrong, Ft Strother, Ft Leslie, Ft Chinneby, Ft Jonesboro, Ft Williams, Ft Confederation, Ft York, Ft Tombeche, Ft Okfuskee, Ft Toulouse, Ft Jackson, Ft Decatur, Ft Hull, Ft Mitchell, Ft Bambridge, Ft Easley, Landrums Ft, Ft White, Catos Ft, Ft St Stephens, McGrews Ft, Currys Ft, Ft Curney, Ft Montgomery, Ft Mimms, Ft Stoddard, Ft Louis de la Mobile, Ft Charlotte, Ft Conde, Ft Crawford, Ft Dale, Ft Bibb, Ft Sinquefield, Ft Lavier, Ft Madison, Ft Claiborne

Trail Of Tears National Historic Trail

Fort Likens Site

Ft. Likens

Fort  Likens was established at Barry Springs in northern Cherokee County. All Cherokee Indians including men, women and children living in the area surrounding the fort would have been rounded up and held there until  they were sent to Fort Payne. Ft. Likens housed the federal troops responsible for rounding up the Cherokees on May, 24, 1838 and placing them in an internment camp located nearby at Barry Springs where they were held until they were transported to Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma) on the infamous Trail of Tears.

CSS Jamestown (1861 - 1862) | Also known as Thomas Jefferson

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero

 
Obituary Notice for Thomas L. Harrison
At Mobile, Thomas L. Harrison, the hero on the confederate side in the Battle of Mobile Bay, died Friday night, aged fifty-one years.  He graduated from Annapolis, and at the age of twenty years, he entered the confederate naval service. He was ordered to Mobile in 1862 and appointed executive office for the gunboat Morgan.  

In the battle in the spring of 1865, when Farragut forced an entrance into Mobile Bay, the little vessel was soon driven under the shelter of the guns of Fort Morgan, the ram

 

Tennessee and the gunboat Selma having been captured and the gunboat Gaines burned.  

The captain of the Morgan gave orders to abandon the ship and set her on fire.  Lieutenant Harrison, however, reminding the crew that this was the only free vessel in the bay and would be of incalculable value to the confederacy if saved, asked the men to volunteer to run the boat up to Mobile.  Every man stepped to the starboard. Thereupon Harrison requested the captain to step below.

Neamathla, who has been one of the most distinguished of the Seminoles, and was at one time their head man, or principal chief, was by birth a Creek.

Battle Of Hobdy’s Bridge: Last Significant Indian Battle In Alabama

BATTLE OF HOBDY’S BRIDGE
BARBOUR COUNTY HOME PAGE
On March 24th, 1837, the last significant Indian battle in Alabama was fought between 900 warriors of the Creek Nation and white settlers. Led by General William Wellborn, a large force of volunteers and militia left Eufaula, Alabama (then called Irwinton) to find and capture or kill the Creek Indians who had fled into the swamps following an attack on the camp where they were being held prior to their removal to present-day Oklahoma. Reaching Hobdy’s Bridge, then a long wooden span and causeway, Wellborn learned that the main party of Creeks were  camped about one mile north of the bridge. Sending part of his force up the east or Barbour County side of the Pea River under Captain Harrell, he moved up the west or Pike County side with his primary command. As he neared the site of the camp, gunfire erupted in the swamp. Wellborn defeated the refugee Creeks but had failed to surround and capture them. They fled south  down the Pea River to its confluence with the  Choctawhatchee and continued across the line into Florida. Several hundred men, women and children fled into the Pea River swamps and began and desperate attempt to make their way to Florida. Outraged over the attacks, they were determined to fight their way through if that’s what it took.