Gallant, Alabama

Gallant, also known as Clear Springs or Greasy Cove, is a census-designated place and unincorporated community in Etowah county and St. Clair county. It lies west of the city of Gadsden, As of the 2010 census, its population was 855.  

Clarkesville, Alabama

Clarkesville, Alabama
 
Clarkesville, Alabama: A Ghost Town
Clarkesville (also spelled Clarksville) is a ghost town in Clarke County, Alabama. It was the county seat of Clarke County until 1831. Clarkesville Alabama History
The Alabama legislature appointed a group of county commissioners on 13 December 1819 to select a site for Clarke County’s “seat of justice.” The legislature made the provision that the site had to be within 3 miles (4.8 km) of the center of county. The commissioners founded Clarkesville as a result. It remained the county seat until 1831, when growing dissatisfaction within the county caused the relocation of the seat to Macon, later renamed Grove Hill.

Bluffton, Alabama

Bluffton, Alabama,  was founded as a mining community in 1888 Cherokee County, Alabama. In 1890, Bluffton was home to approximately 8,000 residents. The Bluffton Land, Ore and Furnace Company operated an iron mine in the area, and was also responsible for building the Signal Hotel, which at one point hosted Rudyard Kipling. The Signal Hotel was the first structure in Cherokee County with electric lights. Bluffton had one newspaper, the Bluffton Mascot, and was home to a Methodist Episcopal church and Salem Baptist Church, which is still in use today.

Washington, Alabama

Washington, Alabama : Alabama Ghost Town
Washington, Alabama is a ghost town located in Autauga County, Alabama on the north bank of the Alabama River, just west of the mouth of Autauga Creek. Washington was founded in 1817 on the site of the former Autauga Indian town of Atagi and named in honor of George Washington. On November 22, 1819, the Alabama territorial legislature chose Washington as the county seat of Autauga County, which it remained until 1830. A courthouse, hotel, jail, post office and pillory were constructed to meet the needs of the county government. The county seat was moved to Kingston in 1830 in order to be closer to the geographic center of the county.

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village
ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

On the east bank of the Tallapoosa River, in Randolph County, Alabama,  near the mouth of Cedar Creek was another Upper Creek village Atchinalgi. The community was destroyed on November 13, 1813 by General James White and his troops from Tennessee.  Wikipedia contributors, “James White (general),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_White_(general)&oldid=827827679 (accessed March 20, 2018). Following the Fort Mims massacre of August 1813, Andrew Jackson and John Coffee led the Tennessee militia into northern Alabama in October of that year to engage a contingent of hostile “Red Stick” Creeks. The militiamen scored victories at the Battle of Tallushatchee (November 3) and at the Battle of Talladega (November 9).

Map of the Creek Cession according to the 1814 treaty

Abikakutchee

Abikakutchee – Creek Indian Town
Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements Index Page

The Indian village of Abikakutchee, also spelled “Abicouchie,” and “Abikudshi” was located, according to W. Stuart Harris’s Dead Towns of Alabama, “Situated on a mile-wide plain, Abikudshi was approximately a mile from where the Sylacauga Highway crosses over Tallassehatchee Creek, on the right bank of the creek, 5 miles east of the Coosa River, in Talladega County, Alabama.”  

Abikakutchee was another Upper Creek Indian town located in Talladega County. The site was first recorded on maps in 1733 and a census in 1760 listed 130 Indian warriors living there. Those living there were later reported to have a few cattle, hogs and horses and to assist the white people who lived among them. The site of the town is a mile from where the Sylacauga Highway goes over Tallassehatchee Creek.

Abihka

Abihka was an Upper Creek Indian town east of the Coosa River and south of Tallassehatchee Creek. The first record of the town is found on Delisle’s map of 1704, where they are “les Abelkas,” and are noted on the east side of the Coosa River, apparently just above the influx of the Pakantalahassi.— Winsor. Belen’s map of 1733, also places the “Abeccas” on the east side of the Coosa, but at some distance from it. The name “Abihka” (meaning unknown), is sometimes used to refer to all the Upper Creek peoples. The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.”