Alabama King Mine

“Alabama King Mine” is a past producer deposit site in the Appalachian Highlands of Alabama, The United States. It is a small deposit, not considered to be of world-class significance. Gold deposits are documented at “Alabama King Mine.” Gold is present at a grade sufficient to have a strong effect on the economics of an excavation project. It may even be viable as the only commodity mined.

Hog Mountain Goldmine

Hog Mountain Goldmine
The largest occurrence of gold in Alabama was found in the Hog Mountain District of Tallapoosa County in 1839. It has produced about 25,000 ounces of gold, or about half of Alabama’s total gold production. Other major districts include the Eagle Creek and Goldville districts of Tallapoosa County and the Arbacoochee district of Cleburne County. Tallapoosa County composed four principal gold districts: Goldville, Hog Mountain, Eagle Creek and Devil’s Backbone. Miners worked out for placer gold deposits in the shoal sands and stream gravels in watercourses, like in the streams of Owl Hollow Valley, Long Branch Creek, Channahatchee Creek, Kowaliga Creek, Copper Creek and the headwaters of the Peru Creek.

Goldville Alabama

Goldville Alabama

Goldville Alabama

Goldville is a town in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, United States. The population was 55 at the 2010 census, up from 37 in 2000.The name of the area derives from the discovery of large gold deposits in the area. The area was so popular with prospecters that at one time the temporary post office of Goldville handled more mail in a day than New York City. The historical monument in the town reads: “Goldville, Alabama incorporated on January 25, 1843 was at one time one of the largest cities in Alabama with a population of near 5,000. With the coming of the California gold rush in 1849 the city became a dormant municipality later to be reinstated on July 9, 1973.”