Abihka

Abihka was an Upper Creek Indian town east of the Coosa River and south of Tallassehatchee Creek. The first record of the town is found on Delisle’s map of 1704, where they are “les Abelkas,” and are noted on the east side of the Coosa River, apparently just above the influx of the Pakantalahassi.— Winsor. Belen’s map of 1733, also places the “Abeccas” on the east side of the Coosa, but at some distance from it. The name “Abihka” (meaning unknown), is sometimes used to refer to all the Upper Creek peoples. The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.”

Native-American-Tribes-Alabama

Native American Tribes Alabama

Native American Tribes in Alabama
Native American History in Alabama
When Andrew Jackson became president of the United States in 1829, his government took a hard line. Jackson abandoned the policy of his predecessors of treating different Indian groups as separate nations. Instead, he aggressively pursued plans against all Indian tribes which claimed constitutional sovereignty and independence from state laws, and which were based east of the Mississippi River. They were to be removed to reservations in Indian Territory west of the Mississippi (now Oklahoma), where their laws could be sovereign without any state interference. At Jackson’s request, the United States Congress opened a debate on an Indian Removal Bill.

Ocuse

Ochuse
A port and neighboring town, on the Gulf coast, either on Mobile or Pensacola Bay, in which the DeSoto fleet wintered, 1540. Thought to be the present Mobile Bay. (P. A. B.)

Aboriginal Towns In Alabama Handbook of the Alabama Anthropological Society, 1920

Montevallo-Alabama

Montevallo Alabama

The area where Montevallo is now was once controlled by the Creek Indians. After being acquired in 1814 Jesse Wilson claimed a small hill on the northern bank of the Shoal Creek and created a homestead there, making it the oldest settlement in Shelby County. Wilson’s friends and family followed afterwards and also settled in the area, and a settlement known as Wilson’s Hill developed on the site. The settlement’s location at almost the exact center of Alabama meant it was considered one of the potential sites for the University of Alabama. In an attempt to encourage the university to choose the site the settlement changed its name to Montevallo, which is Italian for the hill in the valley.