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Madison Alabama

Today, Madison is one of the fastest growing cities in the southeastern United States, with one of the highest per capita incomes and a school system that is recognized for scholastic excellence at the local, state, and national level.

The Mayor and the City Council continue to invest in economic development, public facilities, and infrastructure.

Madison has been listed as a US News & World Report “Top 10 Places to Grow Up”, a CNN Money “Top 100 Best Places to Live”, one of Family Circle’s “10 Best Towns for Family”, and was recognized as Google’s “2013 Digital Capital of Alabama”.

Alabama-Civil-War

Alabama Civil War

Alabama declared that it had seceded from the United States of America on January 11, 1861. It then quickly joined the Confederate States during the American Civil War. A slave state, Alabama provided a significant source of troops and leaders, military material, supplies, food, horses and mules; however, very little of the state’s cotton crop could be sold, as the main port of Mobile was closed off by the U.S. Navy.

CSS-Tennessee Confederate Ironclad Ram

CSS Tennessee

CSS Tennessee was a casemate ironclad ram built for the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. She served as the flagship of Admiral Franklin Buchanan, commander of the Mobile Squadron, after her commissioning. She was captured in 1864 by the Union Navy during the Battle of Mobile Bay and then participated in the Union’s subsequent Siege of Fort Morgan. Tennessee was decommissioned after the war and sold in 1867 for scrap. ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Made in Alabama Index

Battery Duportail located inside Fort Morgan Alabama

Battery Duportail

Battery Duportail
Credits:

Content is available under Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike. http://fortwiki.com/Battery_Duportail

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE

BATTLEFIELDS AND FORTS MAIN PAGE
ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail was a reinforced concrete, Endicott Period 12 inch coastal gun battery on Fort Morgan , Baldwin County, Alabama. The battery was named in G.O. 78, 15 May 1903 after Maj. Gen. Louis L. Duportail, Chief of Engineers (1777-1783), Continental Army, who served with distinction during the Revolutionary War and who died at sea in 1802 while en route to France. Battery construction started in 1898, was completed in 1900 and transferred to the Coast Artillery for use 3 Jun 1900 at a cost of $ 172,646.05.

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama
May 4, 1865
Citronelle, Alabama

At the wars end Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor held command of the administrative entity called the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, with some 12,000 troops. Mobile, Alabama had fallen to Union forces in April of 1865 and Taylor had received news of General Johnston’s surrender to Union General Sherman. Taylor agreed to meet Union Major General E.R.S. Canby for a conference a few miles north of Mobile at Magee Farm, in the town of Kushla, on April 30th at which time they established a truce, terminable after 48 hours notice by either party. The Confederate general arrived at Magee Farm on a handcar propelled by two African Americans. A single officer, Colonel William Levy, accompanied them. General Canby, on the other hand, reached the meeting place accompanied by his staff in dress uniforms, a full brigade of Union troops and a military band. The two generals met 20 miles further north at Citronelle in Mobile County on May 4, 1865.

Cullman Alabama

Cullman Alabama
Cullman is a city in Cullman County. Cullman is located along Interstate 65, about 50 miles north of Birmingham and about 55 miles south of Huntsville. In the time before European settlement, the area that today includes Cullman was originally in the territory of the Cherokee Nation. Cullman Alabama History
The region was traversed by a trail known as the Black Warrior’s Path1, which led from the Tennessee River near the present location of Florence, Alabama, to a point on the Black Warrior River south of Cullman. This trail figured significantly in Cherokee history, and it featured prominently in the American Indian Wars prior to the establishment of the state of Alabama and the relocation of several American Indian tribes, including the Creek people westward along the Trail of Tears.

CSS Jamestown (1861 - 1862) | Also known as Thomas Jefferson

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero

 
Obituary Notice for Thomas L. Harrison
At Mobile, Thomas L. Harrison, the hero on the confederate side in the Battle of Mobile Bay, died Friday night, aged fifty-one years.  He graduated from Annapolis, and at the age of twenty years, he entered the confederate naval service. He was ordered to Mobile in 1862 and appointed executive office for the gunboat Morgan.  

In the battle in the spring of 1865, when Farragut forced an entrance into Mobile Bay, the little vessel was soon driven under the shelter of the guns of Fort Morgan, the ram

 

Tennessee and the gunboat Selma having been captured and the gunboat Gaines burned.  

The captain of the Morgan gave orders to abandon the ship and set her on fire.  Lieutenant Harrison, however, reminding the crew that this was the only free vessel in the bay and would be of incalculable value to the confederacy if saved, asked the men to volunteer to run the boat up to Mobile.  Every man stepped to the starboard. Thereupon Harrison requested the captain to step below.