Mobile-Alabama

Mobile Alabama

Mobile Alabama began as the first capital of colonial French Louisiana in 1702. During its first 100 years, Mobile was a colony of France, then Britain, and lastly Spain. Mobile first became a part of the United States of America in 1813, with the annexation of West Florida under President James Madison. In 1861, Alabama joined the Confederate States of America, which surrendered in 1865.

CSS Jamestown (1861 - 1862) | Also known as Thomas Jefferson

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero

 
Obituary Notice for Thomas L. Harrison
At Mobile, Thomas L. Harrison, the hero on the confederate side in the Battle of Mobile Bay, died Friday night, aged fifty-one years.  He graduated from Annapolis, and at the age of twenty years, he entered the confederate naval service. He was ordered to Mobile in 1862 and appointed executive office for the gunboat Morgan.  

In the battle in the spring of 1865, when Farragut forced an entrance into Mobile Bay, the little vessel was soon driven under the shelter of the guns of Fort Morgan, the ram

 

Tennessee and the gunboat Selma having been captured and the gunboat Gaines burned.  

The captain of the Morgan gave orders to abandon the ship and set her on fire.  Lieutenant Harrison, however, reminding the crew that this was the only free vessel in the bay and would be of incalculable value to the confederacy if saved, asked the men to volunteer to run the boat up to Mobile.  Every man stepped to the starboard. Thereupon Harrison requested the captain to step below.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: September 11, 1864

Acting Lieutenant Wiggin led an expedition up Fish River at Mobile Bay to seize an engine used by Confederates in a sawmill and to assist Union soldiers in obtaining lumber. Tinclad U.S.S. Rodolph, Acting Lieutenant George D. Upham, and wooden side-wheeler U.S.S. Stockdale, Acting Master Spiro V. Bennis, with Wiggin embarked, convoyed Army transport Planter to Smith’s mill, where they took the engine, 60,000 feet of lumber, and some livestock. Loading the lumber on board a barge in tow of Planter took almost until nightfall, and in the dusk of the return down-stream, Confederate riflemen took the ships under fire and felled trees ahead of them. The gun-boats returned the fire rapidly and Rodolph broke through the obstructions, enabling the remaining ships to pass downriver.  

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Boyington Oak | Church Street Graveyard | Mobile Alabama

Boyington Oak

The Boyington Oak is a historic Southern live oak in Mobile, Alabama. In a city with many live oaks that are famous for their age and size, the Boyington Oak stands out as a singular example of one famous for the folklore surrounding its origin.
Ghost stories about the tree claim that visitors have reported hearing crying and whispering sounds emanating from the vicinity of the tree.

Bayou La Batre Alabama

Visiting Forrest Gump

Bayou La Batre is mesmerizing. As soon as you arrive at the first traffic light (one of two) at Highway 188 and Padgett Switch Road, it’s not hard to let yourself reminisce about days and places long gone. Speed limit signs in Bayou La Batre need to be replaced with big red caution signs: “Caution. Wonder & Astonishment Ahead!” Turn left.

David Wayne Trippe

David Wayne Trippe

Give A Little Credit Where Credit Is Due
David Wayne Trippe

Up and coming Singer/Songwriter David Wayne Trippe has been involved in Live Performance since 1976. Over the years, he has worked with companies such as Tate Publishing, Giant Records and Integrity Music. He has recorded with David Huff (David and the Giants) and Steve Grisham (The Outlaws) and has shared the stage with Whitecross, New Song, Russ Taff, David and the Giants, Phil Driscol, Lulu, Rusty Goodman and other legends of Gospel and Inspirational Music. He has written or co-written several Christian Songs that have received Radio airplay with success. He began to try his hand at writing Country Songs in 2003, in which several were forwarded to Established Artist.