Alabama-Civil-War

Alabama Civil War Timeline Chronology

Alabama was not the scene of any significant military operations during the Civil War, yet it contributed about 120,000 men to the Confederate service, practically all the white population capable of bearing arms. Most were recruited locally and served with men they knew, which built morale and strengthened ties to home.

May 10 – 14, 1862: Lamb’s Ferry

According to Civil War journals, on May 4, 1862, Union General John Adams and his cavalry troops were at Lamb’s Ferry when they received orders to move down the Tennessee River to Bainbridge Ferry. From May 10 through the 14, 1862, skirmishes between the Union and Confederate troops occurred around Lamb’s Ferry; the area remained occupied by Union soldiers until May 14, 1862.

Dec 12 1862: Barton Alabama

Barton, also known as Barton Station, Barton Depot, or Barton’s, is an unincorporated community located in western Colbert County, Alabama, United States. It is about ten miles west of the county seat of Tuscumbia, and just south of Tennessee River. The community is about four miles southeast of Cherokee on US Route 72.

April 19 – May 3 1863: Streight’s Raid

The actual capture of Streight’s forces was achieved by a clever ruse, when Forrest paraded his much smaller force back and forth in front of Streight, convincing him that he was opposed by a superior force. After surrendering and being informed of the deception Streight reputedly demanded his arms back for a proper fight, a request cheerfully declined by Forrest.

Harper’s Weekly Images of Exploding Ammo Train

April 27 – 28, 1863: Town Creek

Grenville Mellen Dodge (April 12, 1831 – January 3, 1916) was a Union army officer on the frontier and pioneering figure in military intelligence during the Civil War, who served as Ulysses S. Grant’s intelligence Chief in the Western Theater. He served in several notable assignments, including command of the XVI Corps during the Atlanta Campaign.

Battle of Day's Gap Civil War Battlefield

Battle of Day’s Gap

The Battle of Day’s Gap, fought on April 30, 1863, was the first in a series of American Civil War skirmishes in Cullman County, Alabama, that lasted until a battle on May 2nd, known as Streight’s Raid.

Oct 21 1863: Battle of Cherokee Station

On 21 October at 08:00, the XV Corps moved up towards the location of the Confederate troops, with its 1st Division leading. They encountered a large force of Confederate soldiers and opened fire. Musket fire was exchanged for an hour, with the Confederates sustaining heavy losses. After the loss of a significant amount of their men, the Confederates retreated.

May 17, 1864: The Affair at Madison Station

Madison Alabama was the site of a battle in the American Civil War on May 17, 1864, when Col.
Josiah Patterson’s 5th Alabama Cavalry, supported by Col. James H. Stuart’s cavalry battalion and a section of horse artillery, drove Col. Adam G. Gorgas’s 13th Illinois Infantry Regiment from the city.

Jan. 15, 1865 Thomas Noble Farm in Red Hill Alabama

Red Hill is an unincorporated community in Marshall County.
During the American Civil War, one of Nathan B. Forrest’s generals, Hylan B. Lyon, was staying in a private residence in Red Hill. He was captured by a detachment of the 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry, but managed to escape. On February 24, 1894, William Jackson Palmer was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions as colonel leading the 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry at Red Hill, January 14, 1865 where “with less than 200 men, [he] attacked and defeated a superior force of the enemy, captured their fieldpiece and about 100 prisoners without losing a man.”

April 2, 1865: Selma

The Battle of Selma, Alabama (April 2, 1865), formed part of the Union campaign through Alabama and Georgia, known as Wilson’s Raid, in the final phase of the American Civil War.