Town Creek Alabama

Town Creek Alabama

Town Creek is a town in Lawrence County, and is included in the Decatur Metropolitan Area, as well as the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. It incorporated in March 1875. As of the 2010 census, the population of the town is 1,100, down from 1,216 in 2000. Since 1920, it has been the second largest town in Lawrence County after Moulton. Town Creek Alabama History
Town Creek was established in the first half of the 19th century, and was originally known as “Jonesboro” after an early settler, William Jones.

Good Hope Alabama

Good Hope Alabama

Good Hope Alabama
Good Hope Alabama is a town located about 5 miles southwest of Cullman, Alabama.   Town was incorporated in April 1962. In 1842 pioneers mostly Baptists, established a Missionary Baptist Church and chose the name Good Hope.  This church had a cemetery on the south side and doubled as a school on weekdays.  A Lutheran Church was built in 1883 and the Hartwig Cemetery was established on the lot adjoining the church.  A small Catholic Mission was founded in 1896 by German Benedictine Monks. The biggest celebration ever held in Good Hope was the Confederate Veterans Convention on July 4th, 1899 with 1500 in attendance and 53 veterans answering the roll call. The city has seen several changes since it’s incorporation including parks being developed and house and commercial markets expanding. Good Hope Alabama Location
Good hope is located in North-Central Alabama in Cullman County It is bisected into eastern and western halves by Interstate 65.

Centre Alabama

Centre Alabama

Centre is a city in Cherokee County,At the 2010 census the population was 3,489. Centre is the county seat of Cherokee County. Centre Alabama History
Cherokee County was created on January 9, 1836, and named for the Cherokee people who once lived in the area. The famous Cherokee chief Pathkiller lived in Turkeytown near the present town of Centre. In 1836 the newly founded town of Cedar Bluff became the county seat, but in 1844 the county seat was moved to the more centrally located town of Centre.

Waterloo Landing On The Trail Of Tears | Waterloo Alabama

Waterloo Landing | Waterloo Alabama

Waterloo Landing, located on Pickwick Lake (the former Tennessee River), was the site where, in July 1838, the 700-person Cherokee detachment led by Captain Gustavus S. Drane ended its 230-mile overland migration on the Trail Of Tears, boarded the steamboat Smelter, and left on the water route to Indian Territory. Here the party was united and set out on the eleventh aboard the steamboat SMELTER and two large double decked keel boats; the next afternoon they reached Paducah, Kentucky, where Lieutenant Deas left one of the keel boats which he found superfluous. He succeeded in mustering the Indians after a fashion and found that he had 489. (Grant Foreman, Indian Removal: The Emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians, Norman: Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 1956 (copyright 1932), p.291)

Captain G.S. Drane to Major General Winfield Scott — October 17, 1838
Cherokee Agency, Tennessee
17th October 1838

… on my arrival at Waterloo, Alabama I was ordered to muster the company out of the service, to discharge my teams & embark on board the Steamboat Smelter & proceed to Fort Gibson by the way of the Arkansas river, I believed that route unhealthy, & requested Gel Smith to allow me to take the route by Boonesville, Missouri, the route selected previous to the party’s leaving Ross’ Landing.

William Weatherford

William Weatherford
William Weatherford, known as Red Eagle (ca. 1781–March 24, 1824), was a Creek chief of the Upper Creek towns who led many of the Red Sticks actions in the Creek War (1813–1814) against Lower Creek towns and against allied forces of the United States. One of many mixed-race descendants of Southeast Indians who intermarried with European traders and later colonial settlers, William Weatherford was of mixed Creek, French, and Scots ancestry. He was raised as a Creek in the matrilineal nation and achieved his power in it, through his mother’s prominent Wind Clan (as well as his father’s trading connections. After he showed his skill as a warrior, he was given the “war name” of Hopnicafutsahia, or “Truth Teller.”

Marengo County Alabama Map

MARENGO COUNTY ALABAMA

Marengo County Alabama
 

Marengo County Alabama is a county of the state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,027. The largest city is Demopolis, Alabama and the county seat is Linden, Alabama. Marengo County Alabama is home to the Alabama Rural Heritage Center and Chickasaw State Park. The Tombigbee River and Black Warrior River form portions of the western and northern county borders and provide recreational opportunities.

Suggsville Alabama

Suggsville Alabama

Suggsville, Alabama is an unincorporated community in Clarke County, Alabama. It was laid out as a town in 1819 at the crossing of the Old Line Road and Federal Road. The name was chosen in honor of a local storekeeper, William Suggs. The town had many residences, stores, and male and female academies prior to the American Civil War, but declined rapidly in the post-war period. Suggsville is located at 31.58960°N 87.69305°W

 and has an elevation of 381 feet.

Digital Alabama Guide to Pine Apple Alabama

Pine Apple, Alabama

Pine Apple, Alabama

Visit Pine Apple….. The home of Friendship, Southern hospitality and Welcome! Pine Apple is a town in eastern Wilcox County,Alabama, located 20 miles East of Camden on Alabama Highway #10 and 20 miles West of Greenville from exit 128 off Interstate I-65. From the mid-1850s to the early twentieth century, Pine Apple was one of many Black Belt communities nourished by the cotton industry. Pine Apple, Alabama History
Founded in 1825, the town of Pine Apple became a regional commercial center due to its strategic location as the end of the Selma, Alabama to Pensacola, Florida Railroad line from 1871 to the 1890s.