The Man-Slayer Dies At Murder Creek

About this time, a bloody transaction occurred in the territory of the present county of Conecuh. During the revolutionary war, Colonel McGillivray formed an acquaintance with many conspicuous royalists, and, among others, with Colonel Kirkland, of South Carolina. That person was at McGillivray’s house, upon the Coosa, in 1788, with his son, his nephew, and several other gentlemen. They were on their way to Pensacola, where they intended to procure passports, and settle in the Spanish province of Louisiana. When they determined to leave his hospitable abode, McGillivray sent his servant [slave] to guide them to Pensacola.

History of Conecuh County Alabama Chapter 2

Early Settlement of Conecuh by the Whites – Conflict at Battle Branch – First Settlement at Bellville – Founding of Hampden Ridge- Alexander Autrey – Other Settlers – Land Claims – Emigration, & etc.

History of Conecuh County Alabama Chapter 3

Early Privations and Struggles – Unparalleled Difficulties – Scarcity of Shoes – Undaunted Heroism – Meagreness of Blacksmith Facilities – Joshua Betts – A Barefooted Population – Scarcity of Grist Mills – Georgia Currency, & etc.

Clarke County Alabama and Its Surroundings from 1540 to 1877 – Editor’s Preface

My journey from first glance to completion of this project has reaffirmed my belief in the value of historical texts and reminded me that I have a self-imposed responsibility to preserve and pass on for future generations.

Clarke County and Its Surroundings From 1540 To 1877 – Chapter III

Front (west) and north side of Bethel Methodist Church on Old Line Road, northeast of Whatley, Alabama

THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY— 1798-1812
The American was beginning to place himself not only abreast of all the world, but in the lead, for all useful inventions and for daring enterprise and indomitable will. And over the belt of long-leaved pines a new era also dawns.

Clarke County Alabama and Its Surroundings from 1540 to 1877 – Chapter II

About Clarke County, Alabama and Its Surroundings, 1540-1877
SPANISH, FRENCH AND ENGLISH RESIDENTS

Clarke County Alabama and Its Surroundings from 1540 to 1877 – Introduction

Students, faculty, and staff at the South Alabama Institute in Thomasville, Alabama. Circa 1890 - 1909

It may be asked, Why do I especially undertake this work ? And my first answer is, Because it is a variety of literary work which I peculiarly love. Persons should do, if possible and right, what they like to do. Seeing a fine opportunity for pleasant employment, why, in this land of freedom, should I not improve it ?

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY ALABAMA by John Simpson Graham

History of Clarke County Alabama by John Simpson Graham, Editied by Terry W. Platt

Clarke County is situated between the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, extending from the cut-off on the south, north to the north boundary line of the south third of Township 12, a distance of about 65 miles. The county has an area of about 1,200 square miles, or 768,000 square acres, and has a population of between 31,000 and 32,000.

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY: THE SAMPLE-WILLIAMS CLAY AND COLOR COMPANY

They are miners and shippers of
yellow ochre and china clays, also manufacturers of all clay commodities, such
as clap turpentine cups, hollow building blocks, brick, drain tile, flower pots,
jugs, churns and all other clay novelties.

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY: WHITE SETTLERS IN CLARKE

History of Clarke County Alabama by John Simpson Graham, Editied by Terry W. Platt

In the year 1800 the white people began to settle in this county, and by
1813 there were quite a number of settlers along the west side of the county. In
1813 the Indians became very troublesome and the whites became alarmed and began
the erection of forts at various points in the county. According to Ball’s
history of Clarke County, they were located as follows:

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY: OIL WELL

Bird's-Eye View of Thomasville, Alabama. Circa 1880 - 1889

For instance, they
discover that in Clarke County, some time in the centuries gone by, there was an
upheaval, ripping the county open from Section 21 (where it goes into the
Tombigbee River), Township 5 North, Range 2 East, to the same river in Township
8 North, Range 1 West.

Turkeytown

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.