Choccolocco Alabama

Choccolocco is the Anglicization of the Creek words, choko rakko, which mean “house big.” By the 1700s, the term referred to the Creek ceremonial square, which was bounded by wooden bleachers with awnings. It was at that time, too large to have a roof, but was still called a building.

Choccolocco is the Anglicization of the Creek words, choko rakko, which mean “house big.” By the 1700s, the term referred to the Creek ceremonial square, which was bounded by wooden bleachers with awnings.

Montevallo Alabama

Montevallo-Alabama

The area where Montevallo is now was once controlled by the Creek Indians. After being acquired in 1814 Jesse Wilson claimed a small hill on the northern bank of the Shoal Creek and created a homestead there, making it the oldest settlement in Shelby County. Wilson’s friends and family followed afterwards and also settled in the area, and a settlement known as Wilson’s Hill developed on the site. The settlement’s location at almost the exact center of Alabama meant it was considered one of the potential sites for the University of Alabama. In an attempt to encourage the university to choose the site the settlement changed its name to Montevallo, which is Italian for the hill in the valley.

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee on Henry Timberlake's 1762 "Draught of the Cherokee Country"

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

U.S. and Cherokee troops under Brigadier General James White, following the orders of Major General John Hartwell Cocke, massacred the Hillabee Creek towns along the Tallapoosa River in present-day Cherokee County, AL.

Abikakutchee

Map of the Creek Cession according to the 1814 treaty

Abikakutchee was another Upper Creek Indian town located in Talladega County. The site was first recorded on maps in 1733 and a census in 1760 listed 130 Indian warriors living there.

Atasi Tribe

Atasi Tribe A sub-tribe of the Muskgoee. The Muscogee, also known as the Muskogee, Muscogee Creek, Creek, Mvskokvlke, or the Muscogee Creek Confederacy (pronounced [məskógəlgi]) in the Muscogee language, are a related group of indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands. Their original homelands are in what now comprises southern Tennessee, all of Alabama, western Georgia […]

Abihka Creek Indian Village

Creek-Indian-Tribe-of-Alabama

Abihka was one of the four mother towns of the Muscogee Creek confederacy. It is now a ceremonial ground in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. Abihka is also sometimes used to refer to all Upper Creek (or Muscogee) peoples.

William Weatherford

William Weatherford William Weatherford, known as Red Eagle (ca. 1781–March 24, 1824), was a Creek chief of the Upper Creek towns who led many of the Red Sticks actions in the Creek War (1813–1814) against Lower Creek towns and against allied forces of the United States. One of many mixed-race descendants of Southeast Indians who […]

Hilabee: An Important Creek Town

The Hillabee complex, focused along the Hillabee and Enitachopco Creeks, dates back at least to the late 17th century. During the late 18th and early 19th centuries the complex lay in the approximate center of the Creek Confederacy’s territory. Its population probably peaked after the Creek War (1813–14), then declined. Creek settlement in the area ended with the forced removal of the Muscogee people during the 1830s.

Nehemathla Micco or Neamathia Micco: Creek Chief

Neamathla and the Fowltown warriors, all Red Sticks, were defeated in the Battle of Uchee Creek (1813) by the “southern” Creeks. They might have won had they not run out of ammunition. When a supply party with ammunition was attacked on its return from Pensacola — a preemptive strike — by U.S. forces, the Red Sticks defeated them at the Battle of Burnt Corn.