Company K First Alabama Regiment – THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE CHAPTER VI

The enemy made no more general assaults upon the works until June 14th, but in the meantime were approaching by parallels and planting batteries of heavy siege and naval guns. A steady fire was kept up day and night both by the fleet and the land batteries. There were about eighty siege pieces in these latter. An eight-inch howitzer so planted as to enfilade a portion of the southern line of defences, caused much amusement as well as annoyance to the Confederates.

Siege and surrender of port Hudsonthe investment-SKIRMISHING-THE FIRST GRAND ASSAULT

ASSAILED AND ASSAILANTS-DOUBLY ARMED-LIEUT.

PRATT AT BATTERY II-THE ESSEX DRIVEN OFF-

LIEUT. ADAMS ELECTED-ARTILLERY PRACTICE-AS SAULT OF JUNE I4TH-EFFECT OF BUCK AND BALL-

BANKS INHUMANITY-LEAD FOR WATER-A GALLANT

CORPORAL-BATTERY I I SILENCED-GALLANT SCHUR-

MURS DEATH-THE SUNKEN BATTERY-MULE AND

PEAS-THE FALL OF VICKSBURG-UNCONDITIONAL

SURRENDER-GEN. GARDNERS SWORD-CASUALTIES

OF THE FIRST.

Exploration and Settlement Before 1675

Well over a century after de Soto had secretly been buried in its lower reaches, Joliet and Marquette located and sailed halfway down the mississippi River. For the next hundred years, this inland emprire east of the Mississippi was the object of fierce contention among Europeans and between the Indian and the white man.

THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: Chapter V

Col. Steadman at once began a strict system of discipline and drill. The following was the order of the day: Reveille at daybreak with roll-call, inspection of arms and policing of camps; 6 a. m., drill in the school of the soldier; 7 A. M., breakfast; 8.30 a. m., guard mounting; 9 A. m., non-commissioned officers’ drill; 10 a. m., drill in the school of the company; 12 m., dinner; 1 p. m., skirmish drill; 3 p. m., battalion drill; 5 p. m., dress parade; sunset, retreat; 9 P.M., taps.