HISTORY OF ALABAMA CHAPTER XXXII: BATTLE OF BURNT CORN—ARRIVAL OF GEN. CLAIBORNE’S ARMY

“Peter McQueen, at the head of the Tallase warriors; High-Head Jim, with the
Autaugas; and Josiah Francis, with the Alabamas, numbering in all three hundred
and fifty, departed for Pensacola with many pack-horses. On their way they beat
and drove off all the Indians who not take the war talk. The brutal McQueen beat
an unoffending white trader within an inch of his life, and carried the wife of
Curnells, the government interpreter, a prisoner to Pensacola. The village of
Hatchechubba was reduced to ashes.

Story of the Sinking of the Alabama The Famous Confederate States Cruiser

Story of the Sinking of the Alabama
The Famous Confederate States Cruiser
Excerpt from an Interview With Captain John McIntosh Kell
Executive officer of the Alabama,

Given to Alfred Iverson Branham,
Forty-Six Years Ago,
June, 1883. The Interview was Published in The Eatonton, Georgia, Messenger, and The Atlanta Constitution, and in a London, England, Periodical, over the Nom de Plume, “Wood Holt.” The Sinking of the Alabama. After a bountiful and elegant dinner, such a one as used to grace the boards of Southern homes before the war, I cornered Captain Kell on the front porch of his house and said to him:

“Now, Captain, tell me about the Alabama’s last fight.” “After a cruise of two years,” the captain said, “during which the Alabama had driven the commerce of the United States from the seas, our ship was sadly in need of repairs.

Barton Alabama

Between December 1862 and October 1863, several skirmishes took place in Barton as part of the American Civil War. Confederate forces sought to prevent the Union Army from invading the Tennessee Valley from their stronghold in Corinth, Mississippi.

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.

HISTORY OF CONECUH COUNTY

BEING A DETAILED RECORD OF EVENTS FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PRESENT; BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN MOST CONSPICUOUS IN THE ANNALS OF THE COUNTY;
A COMPLETE LIST OF THE OFFICIALS OF CONECUH, BESIDES MUCH VALUABLE INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE INTERNAL RESOURCES OF THE county.

HISTORICAL SITES IN ALABAMA

In order to better provide precise information for our diverse readership, we would like to point out that we differentiate between the words “historic” and “historical.” We use “historic” in the context of describing famous or important places and events.  “Historical” is used  when describing places or events of the past that have no great significance today but may be of interest to some.