HISTORY OF ALABAMA TABLE OF CONTENTS by ALBERT JAMES PICKETT:

Growing up, Albert befriended many of the Creek and frontier traders that frequented his father’s store. From them he began to piece together the early history of the state which he later determined to put into writing.

Pickett studied law, but never practiced professionally, instead devoting his time to literature, agriculture and historical research. He traveled widely and corresponded with archivists and book dealers in the Atlantic states and Europe in order to document various parts of his history of the state. The two-volume History of Alabama was published in Charleston, South Carolina in 1851.

Section 1 of A. J. Pickett’s “Interesting Notes upon the History of Alabama.”

Albert James Pickett

This section gives information from Colonel Jeremiah Austill, “in relation to the ‘Canoe Fight’ & other engagements in which he was concerned in the memorable years 1813, 1814.” Austill’s account includes sketches of relevant forts and waterways in southwestern Alabama. A transcript is included.
Subject:
Austill, Jeremiah, 1794-1881
Dale, Sam, 1772-1841
Creek Indians
Creek War, 1813-1814–Campaigns
Creek War, 1813-1814–Military personnel
Indians of North America–Wars

The Man-Slayer Dies At Murder Creek

About this time, a bloody transaction occurred in the territory of the present county of Conecuh. During the revolutionary war, Colonel McGillivray formed an acquaintance with many conspicuous royalists, and, among others, with Colonel Kirkland, of South Carolina. That person was at McGillivray’s house, upon the Coosa, in 1788, with his son, his nephew, and several other gentlemen. They were on their way to Pensacola, where they intended to procure passports, and settle in the Spanish province of Louisiana. When they determined to leave his hospitable abode, McGillivray sent his servant [slave] to guide them to Pensacola.

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero

CSS Jamestown (1861 - 1862) | Also known as Thomas Jefferson

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero   Obituary Notice for Thomas L. Harrison At Mobile, Thomas L. Harrison, the hero on the confederate side in the Battle of Mobile Bay, died Friday night, aged fifty-one years.  He graduated from Annapolis, and at the age of twenty years, he entered the confederate naval […]

HISTORY OF CONECUH COUNTY

BEING A DETAILED RECORD OF EVENTS FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PRESENT; BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN MOST CONSPICUOUS IN THE ANNALS OF THE COUNTY;
A COMPLETE LIST OF THE OFFICIALS OF CONECUH, BESIDES MUCH VALUABLE INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE INTERNAL RESOURCES OF THE county.

History of Conecuh County Alabama Chapter 2

Early Settlement of Conecuh by the Whites – Conflict at Battle Branch – First Settlement at Bellville – Founding of Hampden Ridge- Alexander Autrey – Other Settlers – Land Claims – Emigration, & etc.

History of Conecuh County Alabama Chapter 3

Early Privations and Struggles – Unparalleled Difficulties – Scarcity of Shoes – Undaunted Heroism – Meagreness of Blacksmith Facilities – Joshua Betts – A Barefooted Population – Scarcity of Grist Mills – Georgia Currency, & etc.

Turkeytown

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.

Palos, Alabama No 3 Coal Mine Explosion, May 1910

The difficulty of the rescue work tonight is enhanced by the stygian darkness. There are no lights except miners’ lamps and a few lanterns. The mining village of Palos is all excitement tonight and the wives, daughters and friends of the entombed men present a pitiful sight as they stand above the bank of the river on the opposite side from the mine wringing their hands and crying.

HISTORY OF ALABAMA CHAPTER XXXII: BATTLE OF BURNT CORN—ARRIVAL OF GEN. CLAIBORNE’S ARMY

“Peter McQueen, at the head of the Tallase warriors; High-Head Jim, with the
Autaugas; and Josiah Francis, with the Alabamas, numbering in all three hundred
and fifty, departed for Pensacola with many pack-horses. On their way they beat
and drove off all the Indians who not take the war talk. The brutal McQueen beat
an unoffending white trader within an inch of his life, and carried the wife of
Curnells, the government interpreter, a prisoner to Pensacola. The village of
Hatchechubba was reduced to ashes.

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.