This image of Constable J. L. McGowan standing, rifle in hand, over the corpse of ?Railroad Bill? strapped to a wooden plank, sold for 50 cents in the days following the notorious outlaw's death in March 1896.

The Legend of Railroad Bill

There is a legend in south Alabama, associated with the spirit of a man known as, “Railroad Bill”. This story, from slave cultures, during the post-Civil War era, during the reconstruction of the South, documents a “Robin Hood” type character who stole from food trains and sold the items to poor, rural southern families for less than they could buy them in general stores.

Legend-of-The-Confederate-Gold

Confederate Gold

Legend of
The Lost Confederate Gold
Legend tells of two crates, each sized about 2’x3’x4′ were filled with gold and silver coins said to be around $100,000 in value and buried by Confederate forces. Some stories say the crates were made of wood, some say metal. The crates were buried when Union forces were approaching as the wagon transporting the treasure became stuck in a bog-hole near Athens Alabama. The cache was made at an 1865 era steam crossing about 4 miles North of of Athens and about 1/2 mile West of the crossing. More Alabama Gold Stories and Treasure Legends.

ANNISTON ALABAMA

The establishment and growth of Fort McClellan and the Anniston Army Depot during the First and the Second World Wars boosted Anniston’s social life and economic status, luring in thousands of new residents.

Union-Springs-Alabama

Union Springs Alabama

Union Springs, a small historic town, is the county seat of Bullock County. Located in southeast Alabama, it is less than an hour’s drive from several destination cities, including Montgomery, Auburn, Troy, and Eufaula.

Scratch Ankle Alabama

Scratch Ankle Alabama

When it comes to unusual town names this on may have you scratching your head. Deep in Monroe County, about 80 miles southwest of Montgomery, sits the town of Scartch Ankle.

Monte Sano State Park

Monte Sano State Park

Monte Sano State Park is a publicly owned recreation area and mountaintop retreat encompassing 2,140 acres on the eastern portion of the top and slopes of Monte Sano Mountain on the east side of Huntsville, Alabama.