Dauphin Island Alabama Treasure Legends

Dauphin Island legend says in 1710 or 1711, a treasure-seeking Jamaican pirate ship invaded Dauphin Island. An alleged jeweled gold cross on the island’s Catholic church was to be their prize. The legend continues to say the priest of the church realizing the pirates would come for the cross, grabbed it and dived into a nearby well, the gold cross clutched in his arms. Neither was seen again.

French Treasure Ship Yet To Be Found

French Treasure Ship Yet To Be Found
In September 1724, a French merchant ship was located off the coast of present-day Alabama near present-day Dauphin Island.  The vessel was “La Bellone.” In her hold was stored a cargo of beaver skins, deer hides, tobacco, indigo and coins and bullion valued at 40,000 crowns. She was on her way to Dauphin Island to collect the yearly production of goods by the French colonials in Louisiana, and transport them to France. While trying to enter Pelican Bay, the Bellone ran aground.

This image of Constable J. L. McGowan standing, rifle in hand, over the corpse of ?Railroad Bill? strapped to a wooden plank, sold for 50 cents in the days following the notorious outlaw's death in March 1896.

The Legend of Railroad Bill

There is a legend in south Alabama, associated with the spirit of a man known as, “Railroad Bill”. This story, from slave cultures, during the post-Civil War era, during the reconstruction of the South, documents a “Robin Hood” type character who stole from food trains and sold the items to poor, rural southern families for less than they could buy them in general stores.

Alabama Treasure Map

Alabama Treasure Map

Alabama treasure map marks the approximate location of the treasures legends researched. Keep in mind that most, if not all, of these legends and tales of burried treasure are nothing more than legend without any hard evidence whatsoever.

Buttahatchie River: The Buttahatchee River rises in northwestern Winston County, Alabama, near the town of Delmar, and flows generally westwardly through Marion County, where it collects a short tributary, the West Branch Buttahatchee River. At Hamilton, Alabama, the river turns to the southwest and flows through Lamar County, Alabama and Monroe County, Mississippi; its lower reach is used to define part of the boundary between Monroe and Lowndes Counties. The Buttahatchee joins the Tombigbee near Columbus Air Force Base, 12 mi north-northwest of Columbus.

The Long Lost Ark of the Covenant – A Wonder Verified

Research continues on an incident that allegedly occured in Marion County Alabama. While reviewing archives at the Library Of Congress, this interesting article was found which was printed in “The Hickman Courier” in Hickman Kentucky on August 28, 1885. The article is a reprint of an article printed in the “Pulaski Citizen,” a newspaper in Pulaski Tennessee. The article(s) tell of the finding of “The Long Lost Ark of the Covenant” in Marion County Alabama. Evidently the article was republished around the country.