Choccolocco Alabama

Choccolocco is the Anglicization of the Creek words, choko rakko, which mean “house big.” By the 1700s, the term referred to the Creek ceremonial square, which was bounded by wooden bleachers with awnings. It was at that time, too large to have a roof, but was still called a building.

Choccolocco is the Anglicization of the Creek words, choko rakko, which mean “house big.” By the 1700s, the term referred to the Creek ceremonial square, which was bounded by wooden bleachers with awnings.

Tawasa Indians of Alabama

Alabama-Native-American-Tribes

Tawasa Indians of Alabama Tawasa Tribe. Meaning unknown. Tawasa Connections. They spoke a dialect belonging to the Timucuan division of the Muskhogean linguistic family, intermediate between Timucua proper and Choctaw, Hitchiti, Alabama, and Apalachee. Tawasa Location. In 1706-7 in west Florida about the latitude of the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers; at an […]

Fort Jackson

Creek War Treaty Signed at Fort Jackson on August 9, 1814 near Wetumpka Alabama

Fort Jackson Fort Jackson and Fort Toulouse are two forts that shared the same site at the fork of the Coosa River and the Tallapoosa River, near Wetumpka, Alabama. The last of a series of forts built, Fort Jackson was the scene of some of the most significant events in American history. Fort Jackson was established in April […]

Tuscumbia Landing | Sheffield Alabama

All that remains of what was once Tuscumbia Landing are some limestone pilings that once held up the pier.

Tuscumbia Landing was added to the national historic Trail of Tears on April 15, 2007 and it is where Cherokee and Creek tribes were moved in the 1830’s to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). There are other Trail of Tears sites in nine states but this pristine site on the Tennessee River is rare because Indians were moved by railroad and loaded to boats. The beautiful riverside property is owned by the City of Sheffield and under development by the Port Authority of Tuscumbia Landing. Because local citizens were so hospitable to the migrating Indians, the plan is to build a Welcome Center and invite hundreds of federally recognized tribes for a special day.

Willstown Mission Cemetery

Willstown Mission Cemetery In 1823 Cherokee leaders John Ross, Andrew Ross, and George Lowery persuaded the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions to open a mission/school for the Cherokee in Willstown. Situated on the main road from Ross’s Landing to Willstown, the property was adjacent to a council ground frequently used by the Cherokee […]

Montevallo Alabama

Montevallo-Alabama

The area where Montevallo is now was once controlled by the Creek Indians. After being acquired in 1814 Jesse Wilson claimed a small hill on the northern bank of the Shoal Creek and created a homestead there, making it the oldest settlement in Shelby County. Wilson’s friends and family followed afterwards and also settled in the area, and a settlement known as Wilson’s Hill developed on the site. The settlement’s location at almost the exact center of Alabama meant it was considered one of the potential sites for the University of Alabama. In an attempt to encourage the university to choose the site the settlement changed its name to Montevallo, which is Italian for the hill in the valley.

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee on Henry Timberlake's 1762 "Draught of the Cherokee Country"

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Dog River Plantation, Mobile County, Alabama

In 1988 the Alabama Department of Transportation proposed replacement of the bridge over Dog River at its confluence with Mobile Bay. It was soon discovered that the south bank at the mouth of Dog River was a historically and archaeologically important site.

CHEROKEE INDIAN TRIBE OF ALABAMA

Cherokee Indians of Alabama

From the earliest times of which we have any certain knowledge the Cherokee have occupied the highest districts at the southern end of the Appalachian chain, mainly in the States of Tennessee and North Carolina, but including also parts of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Virginia.

Waterloo Landing in Waterloo Alabama

Waterloo Landing On The Trail Of Tears | Waterloo Alabama

Waterloo Landing was a departure site for Cherokee who had been evicted from their homes and forced to head west to what is now Oklahoma. Back in 1838 this was the Tennessee River. Today the river has been dammed to create Pickwick Lake. Those leaving from this location would have been traveling by steamboat. All there is to do here is stop and read an historical marker.

Apalachee Tribe

The Apalachees lived in and around Moblie, Mobile County, from about 1705 to 1765.

A part of this tribe lived for a time among the Lower Creeks and perhaps in this State. Another section settled near Mobile and remained there until West Florida was ceded to Great Britain when they crossed the Mississippi.

Mobile County Alabama

Mobile-County-Alabama

Mobile County Alabama Mobile County Alabama was occupied for thousands of years by varying cultures of indigenous peoples. The historic Choctaw had occupied this area along what became called the Mobile River when encountered by early French traders and colonists, who founded Mobile in the early eighteenth century. The British took over the territory in […]

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

U.S. and Cherokee troops under Brigadier General James White, following the orders of Major General John Hartwell Cocke, massacred the Hillabee Creek towns along the Tallapoosa River in present-day Cherokee County, AL.

Chickasaw Indian Tribe in Alabama

Chicasa Land tracts in Parts of Tennessee and Alabama

The Chickasaw Tribe had a few settlements in northwestern Alabama, part of which State was within their hunting territories. At one time they also had a town called Ooe-asa (Wi-aca) among the Upper Creeks. (See Mississippi.)