Barbour-County-Alabama

Barbour County Alabama

Barbour County is a county Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,457. Its county seat is Clayton Alabama. Its name is in honor of James Barbour, who served as Governor of Virginia.

Shelby County Alabama Map

SHELBY COUNTY ALABAMA

Shelby County Alabama

Shelby County Alabama is located near the geographic center of the state of Alabama. The county seat of Shelby County is Columbiana Alabama. The county is named in honor of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky from 1792 to 1796 and again from 1812 to 1816. Shelby County Alabama History:
The original county boundaries encompassed lands acquired from the Creek Indians in the 1814 Treaty of Fort Jackson following their defeat at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The first towns in the Cahaba Valley were Wilson’s Hill (now Montevallo) and Shelbyville (now Pelham).

Chatot Indian Tribe

Chatot Indian Tribe
Alabama Native American Tribes Index Page

Meaning unknown, but the forms of this word greatly resemble the synonyms of the name Choctaw. The language spoken by this tribe belonged, undoubtedly, to the southern division of the Muskhogean stock. Chatot Indian Tribe History
The Chatot are first mentioned in a Spanish document of 1639 in which the governor of Florida congratulates himself on having consummated peace between the Chatot, Apalachicola, and Yamasee on one side and the Apalachee on the other. This, he says, “is an extraordinary thing, because the aforesaid Chacatos never maintained peace with anybody.” In 1674 the two missions noted above were established among these people, but the following year the natives rebelled. The disturbance was soon ended by the Spanish officer Florencia, and the Chatot presently settled near the Apalachee town of San Luis, mission work among them being resumed. In 1695, or shortly before, Lower Creek Indians attacked this mission, plundered the church, and carried away 42 Christianized natives.

Alabama Tribe

The Alabama tribe name is perhaps connected with the native word “albina,” meaning “to camp,” or alba amo, “weed gatherer,” referring to the black drink. Also called: Ma’-mo an-ya -di, or Ma’-mo han-ya, by the Biloxi. Oke-choy-atte, given by Schoolcraft (1851-57), the name of an Alabama town, Oktcaiutci.