Alabama-Native-American-Tribes

ALABAMA NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES

ALABAMA NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES

This map, from Robbie Ethridge’s From Chicaza to Chickasaw: The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540-1715, is shocking to the eye. Few (U.S.) Americans have seen historical maps in which indigenous and colonial settlements are treated equally. (The three European towns are highlighted with red (English) and yellow (Spanish) rectangles, which I have added.) Few of us realize the vastness of the inhabited landscape of North America prior to its colonization by Europeans. History is written, and geography is mapped backward from the present to tell the story of inevitable colonial and post-Independence expansion of the United States. Without this perspective, it can seem as if history began with the arrival of European colonists, sidelining stories that predate their settlement, up to and including the vast trade in enslaved native peoples that flourished from 1685 to 1715. Credit: Carwil without Borders
Native American Tribes
Abihka
The members of the Abihka were Upper Creek Indians.

Fort Cusseta: Cusseta, Alabama | Chambers County Alabama

Fort Cusseta: Cusseta, Alabama | Chambers County Alabama

Fort Cusseta was a wooden stockade built by white settlers to protect against possible Creek Indian attacks. Its ruin still exists today within the small city of Cusseta, Alabama. Following the signing of the Creek Treaty in 1832, the early white settlers built a 16 feet by 30 feet hand-hewn log fort for protection from a possible uprising from a Cusseta Indian village on Osanippa Creek just north of the fort.. Walls were four and six feet high with portholes at a height of four feet. The fort never saw any military action.

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village
ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

On the east bank of the Tallapoosa River, in Randolph County, Alabama,  near the mouth of Cedar Creek. Atchinalgi was destroyed on November 13, 1813 by General James White and his troops from Tennessee.  Wikipedia contributors, “James White (general),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_White_(general)&oldid=827827679 (accessed March 20, 2018). Following the Fort Mims massacre of August 1813, Andrew Jackson and John Coffee led the Tennessee militia into northern Alabama in October of that year to engage a contingent of hostile “Red Stick” Creeks. The militiamen scored victories at the Battle of Tallushatchee (November 3) and at the Battle of Talladega (November 9).

Alabama-Ghosts-and-Ghost-Towns

Chulafinnee Alabama

Chulafinnee was a gold mining town about 12 miles south of Heflin, AL. During the boom years, it was about half the size of Arbacoochee, but had more brick buildings.
The mine filed was destroyed by one of the King brothers that were prospectors in the area.
The town was still listed on the state maps as late as 1878.