Marshall County Alabama Map

MARSHALL COUNTY ALABAMA

Cherokees settled along the Creek Path and the Tennessee River as early as 1784 inhabiting the area. Most of the remains of these towns and villages can be identified. During The War Between the States, Marshall County was the scene of several raids by Federal troops. It was unsuccessfully shelled by these troops on July 30, 1862 in an attempt to capture the town. It was again attacked on March 2, 1864, and again on August 24, 1864. It finally yielded to the invaders January 1865, and was burned and destroyed with the exception of six or seven buildings.

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

The Account of Lamhatty

THE ACCOUNT OF LAMHATTY
By DAVID I. BUSHNELL, Jr

An old manuscript of unusual interest, relating to the Creek
Indians in 1706 and 1707, is preserved by the Virginia Historical
Society at Richmond. It forms No. 13, vol. iv, of the Ludwell
Papers, and is now printed for the first time. The manuscript is an account of an Indian from the town of
Towasa who was taken captive by a band of ” Tusckaroras ” and
carried northward through many Creek towns ; later he was sold
to the Souanoukas [Shawnees] , whose village was across the moun-
tains toward the east.

The Sweat Bath-Bleeding–Rubbing–Bathing

THE SWEAT BATH-BLEEDING–RUBBING–BATHING
In addition to their herb treatment the Cherokees frequently resort to sweat baths, bleeding, rubbing, and cold baths in the running stream, to say nothing of the beads and other conjuring paraphernalia generally used in connection with the ceremony. The sweat bath was in common use among almost all the tribes north of Mexico excepting the central and eastern Eskimo, and was considered the great cure-all in sickness and invigorant in health. Among many tribes it appears to have been regarded as a ceremonial observance, but the Cherokees seem to have looked upon it simply as a medical application, while the ceremonial part was confined to the use of the plunge bath. The person wishing to make trial of the virtues of the sweat bath entered the â’sï, a small earth-covered log house only high enough to allow of sitting down. After divesting himself of his clothing, some large bowlders, previously heated in a fire, were placed near him, and over them was poured a decoction of the beaten roots of the wild parsnip.