Bibb-County-Alabama

Historic Places and Ghost Towns in Bibb County Alabama

Bibb County was established in 1818 and called by the name of Cahaba. Two years later it was changed to that of Bibb, in honor of William W. Bibb, the first Governor of the State.

Bibb County was one of the largest counties in the State; but a great deal of its area has been cut off to make up the surrounding counties established later on in the history of the State.

Wakefield Alabama

Wakefield Alabama
Wakefield is a ghost town in Washington County, Alabama, most famous as the place where former vice president Aaron Burr was arrested in 1807. Wakefield was in a bend of the Tombigbee River near present-day McIntosh Bluff. The settlement was named by territorial judge Harry Toulmin after Oliver Goldsmith’s novel The Vicar of Wakefield. Wakefield was the county seat of Washington County from 1805 to 1809. The arrest of Aaron Burr took place in February 1807.

Map of the Alabama and Tennessee River Railroad between Blue Mountain Station and Jacksonville, Calhoun County Alabama

Blue Mountain Alabama

 

Compiled in 1921 by Thomas McAdory Owen, LL.D.
Post office and station at the crossing of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and the Southern Railway; in the northern suburbs of Anniston, 2 miles from the center of the city. It is one of the cotton-mill and iron-mining sections of the city of Anniston. Population: 1910-528. The locality was settled by the Hudgins family in the late thirties and for years was the terminus of the Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad, being the shipping station for the Oxford furnace. During the War, the Confederate Government operated both the railroad and the furnace, the iron being shipped to Selma to make “Ironclads” for the Confederacy.

Louina Alabama Ghost Town in Randolph County Alabama

Louina Alabama

Louina Alabama was settled by the Indians, pushed to Alabama by the white settlers from the overcrowded east in the 1830s. Louina’s trading post quickly became the metropolis of its day with the area producing quantities of gold. Today Louina is a ghost town.

Battelle, Alabama (DeKalb County)

Battelle Alabama

Battelle Alabama was a thriving mining community at the turn of the century, having spread out to the base of Lookout Mountain, five miles north of Valley Head, Alabama. Now, the forest has taken over, and no buildings remain in what was Battelle. Ruins include scattered bricks, rotted lumber, and a few pieces of metal.

Old Barn on Cold Winter Day. Blount County near Blountsville. Submitted by Tyler Cantrell

Historical Sites in Blount County Alabama

Historical Sites in Blount County Alabama

Return to Historical Sites in Alabama Index
Blount County: A County Older Than the State of Alabama

Created Feb. 7, 1818 by Alabama Territorial Legislature from lands ceded by the Creek Indian Nation. Named for the Tennessee Governor W. G. Blount, who sent militia under Andrew Jackson to punish the Creeks for Fort Mims massacre. Jackson fought and won the Creek War. Creeks gave up half of their lands in Treaty of Ft.

Clarkesville, Alabama

Clarkesville, also spelled Clarksville, is a ghost town in Clarke County. It was the county seat of Clarke County until 1831. A small modern community, roughly a mile from the old site, presently calls itself Clarksville.

Blakeley Alabama

Overlooking the marshes of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta just north of Mobile is the site
of the Alabama ghost town of Blakeley.

Now a part of Historic Blakeley State Park, the city once competed with Mobile for the status of queen city of Lower Alabama. All that remains today are gravestones, a few ruins and traces of old streets.