Free Things To Do In Alabama Fort Conde Mobile AL

Fort Conde

Mobile was originally founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville in 1702 as Fort Louis de la Mobile at 27-Mile Bluff up river (27 miles [43 km] from the mouth).[1][2] After the Mobile River flooded and damaged the fort, Mobile was relocated in 1711 to the current site. A temporary wooden stockade fort was constructed, also named Fort Louis after the old fort up river.[1] In 1723, construction of a new brick fort with a stone foundation began, renamed later as Fort Condé in honor of Louis Henri de Bourbon, duc de Bourbon and prince de Condé.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: September 11, 1864

Alabama Civil War Timeline
September 11, 1864
Expedition Up Fish River At Mobile Bay
Acting Lieutenant Wiggin led an expedition up Fish River at Mobile Bay to seize an engine used by Confederates in a sawmill and to assist Union soldiers in obtaining lumber. Tinclad U.S.S. Rodolph, Acting Lieutenant George D. Upham, and wooden side-wheeler U.S.S. Stockdale, Acting Master Spiro V. Bennis, with Wiggin embarked, convoyed Army transport Planter to Smith’s mill, where they took the engine, 60,000 feet of lumber, and some livestock. Loading the lumber on board a barge in tow of Planter took almost until nightfall, and in the dusk of the return down-stream, Confederate riflemen took the ships under fire and felled trees ahead of them. The gun-boats returned the fire rapidly and Rodolph broke through the obstructions, enabling the remaining ships to pass downriver.  

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Boyington Oak | Church Street Graveyard | Mobile Alabama

Boyington Oak

The Boyington Oak is a historic Southern live oak in Mobile, Alabama. In a city with many live oaks that are famous for their age and size, the Boyington Oak stands out as a singular example of one famous for the folklore surrounding its origin.
Ghost stories about the tree claim that visitors have reported hearing crying and whispering sounds emanating from the vicinity of the tree.

Bayou La Batre Alabama

Visiting Forrest Gump

Visiting Forrest Gump

Bayou La Batre Alabama
Bayou La Batre is mesmerizing. As soon as you arrive at the first traffic light (one of two) at Highway 188 and Padgett Switch Road, it’s not hard to let yourself reminisce about days and places long gone. Speed limit signs in Bayou La Batre need to be replaced with big red caution signs: “Caution. Wonder & Astonishment Ahead!” Turn left.