Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

The original Creek Confederacy was in the Alabama-Coosa River Basin

Abikudshi

Abikudshi (‘Little Abihka’). A former Upper Creek town in North Talladega County, Alabama, on the right bank of Tallahatchee Creek, 5 miles east of Coosa River. It was settled by Abihka Indians and some of the Natchez. Bartram (1775) states that the inhabitants spoke a dialect of Chickasaw, which could have been true of only a part.

Abihka

Abihka
“Abihka” has been used as the name of a town, one of the four mother towns of the Muscogee Creek confederacy, and sometimes as a name used to refer to all Upper Creek (or Muscogee) peoples. The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.” A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century. Abihka History and Origins
The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.” A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century. Abihka Etymology
The name “Abihka” (meaning unknown), is sometimes used to refer to all the Upper Creek peoples.

Alabama-Native-American-Tribes

INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS

Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements
When Alabama was first established as part of the Mississippi Territory in the early nineteenth century, the vast majority of the land belonged to the Creek Indian Confederacy, and most of the Native American towns in Alabama were inhabited by the Creeks. The Creek Nation was divided among the group known as the Upper Creeks, who occupied territory along the Coosa, Alabama, and Tallapoosa rivers in central Alabama, and the Lower Creeks, who occupied the areas along the lower Chattahoochee, Ocmulgee, and Flint rivers in southwestern Georgia. Credits: 

Histopolis – Bollaborative Genealogy & History
Geoff Mangum’s Native America Project
Vicki Roema, Footsteps of the Cherokees (2007)
W. Stuart Harris, Dead Towns of Alabama (1977)
Aboriginal Towns in Alabama, Handbook of the Alabama Anthropological Society, 1920
Swanton, John R., Early History of the Creek Indians and Their Neighbors. Pub. Smithosian Institution, Bureau of American Enthnology, Bulletin 73.

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village
ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

On the east bank of the Tallapoosa River, in Randolph County, Alabama,  near the mouth of Cedar Creek. Atchinalgi was destroyed on November 13, 1813 by General James White and his troops from Tennessee.  Wikipedia contributors, “James White (general),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_White_(general)&oldid=827827679 (accessed March 20, 2018). Following the Fort Mims massacre of August 1813, Andrew Jackson and John Coffee led the Tennessee militia into northern Alabama in October of that year to engage a contingent of hostile “Red Stick” Creeks. The militiamen scored victories at the Battle of Tallushatchee (November 3) and at the Battle of Talladega (November 9).

Anatitchapko : Creek Indian Village

Anatitchapko : Creek Indian Village
Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements Index Page

Located in Clay County, Alabama. As with many native American names, people and places, history is full of various spellings for the same person or place. Anatitchapko. Anatitchapko has been known as  Au-net-techap-co, Enitachopka, Enitachopko, Enotochopco, Enotochopko, Enitachopco and Long Swamp. The Battle of Enitachopco occurred only two days after General Andrew Jackson’s victory over the Red Sticks in the Battle of Emuckfau.

Map of the Creek Cession according to the 1814 treaty

Abikakutchee

Abikakutchee – Creek Indian Town
Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements Index Page

The Indian village of Abikakutchee, also spelled “Abicouchie,” and “Abikudshi” was located, according to W. Stuart Harris’s Dead Towns of Alabama, “Situated on a mile-wide plain, Abikudshi was approximately a mile from where the Sylacauga Highway crosses over Tallassehatchee Creek, on the right bank of the creek, 5 miles east of the Coosa River, in Talladega County, Alabama.”  

Abikakutchee was another Upper Creek Indian town located in Talladega County. The site was first recorded on maps in 1733 and a census in 1760 listed 130 Indian warriors living there. Those living there were later reported to have a few cattle, hogs and horses and to assist the white people who lived among them. The site of the town is a mile from where the Sylacauga Highway goes over Tallassehatchee Creek.