Alabama-Native-American-Tribes

ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS

When Alabama was first established as part of the Mississippi Territory in the early nineteenth century, the vast majority of the land belonged to the American Indian Creek Indian Confederacy, and most of the Native American towns and villages in Alabama were inhabited by the Creeks.
Indian towns and settlement patterns were recorded in the accounts of travelers who visited them. Much of this information has been gleaned from:

(1)Aboriginal Towns In Alabama, Handbook of the Alabama Anthropological Society, 1920, and

(2)Swanton, John R., Early History of the Creek Indians and Their Neighbors. Pub. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 73. Washington, 1922.

Atagi: A Tawasee Indian Town

Atagi
Atagi, a Tawasee Indian town, was located on the Alabama River at the mouth of Autauga Creek, in the southeastern corner of Autauga County. The first county seat of Autauga County was established at Washington, Alabama on the site of the town of Atagi, in 1819. Atagi is an Alabama tribal name, referring to both a traditional Alabama Indian village and the band of people who lived there. The village name comes from the Alabama word Aatooka, which means “ballcourt.” Other variants of the same name include Autauga and Atagi.

Hilabee: An Important Creek Town

The Hillabee complex, focused along the Hillabee and Enitachopco Creeks, dates back at least to the late 17th century. During the late 18th and early 19th centuries the complex lay in the approximate center of the Creek Confederacy’s territory. Its population probably peaked after the Creek War (1813–14), then declined. Creek settlement in the area ended with the forced removal of the Muscogee people during the 1830s.