Abihka

Print More

Abihka

“Abihka” has been used as the name of a town, one of the four mother towns of the Muscogee Creek confederacy, and sometimes as a name used to refer to all Upper Creek (or Muscogee) peoples. The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.” A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century.

Abihka History and Origins

The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.” A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century.

Abihka Etymology

The name “Abihka” (meaning unknown), is sometimes used to refer to all the Upper Creek peoples.

Abihka Territory

The members of the Abihka were Upper Creek Indians. Their main place of residence was along the banks of the Coosa and Alabama rivers,[2] in what is now Talladega County, Alabama. Besides the town of Abihka, the Creek had established other important towns in their territory: Abihkutchi, Tuckabutche, Talladega, Coweta, and Kan-tcati.

Abihka Now Ceremonial Grounds

After the removal to the Indian Territory, refugees from the Abihka mother-town established a ceremonial stomp dance ground which they call Abihka (or sometimes, Arbeka). It is located near Henryetta, Oklahoma.

Read more about Alabama Native American Tribes.

1.Waselkov, Gregory & T. Smith, Marvin. (2000). Upper Creek Archaeology. 242-264. 

2. Gregory A. Waselkov and Marvin T. Smith, Upper Creek Archaeology

 

Comments are closed.