HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY ALABAMA by John Simpson Graham

History of Clarke County Alabama by John Simpson Graham, Editied by Terry W. Platt

Clarke County is situated between the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, extending from the cut-off on the south, north to the north boundary line of the south third of Township 12, a distance of about 65 miles. The county has an area of about 1,200 square miles, or 768,000 square acres, and has a population of between 31,000 and 32,000.

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY: THE SAMPLE-WILLIAMS CLAY AND COLOR COMPANY

They are miners and shippers of
yellow ochre and china clays, also manufacturers of all clay commodities, such
as clap turpentine cups, hollow building blocks, brick, drain tile, flower pots,
jugs, churns and all other clay novelties.

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY: WHITE SETTLERS IN CLARKE

History of Clarke County Alabama by John Simpson Graham, Editied by Terry W. Platt

In the year 1800 the white people began to settle in this county, and by
1813 there were quite a number of settlers along the west side of the county. In
1813 the Indians became very troublesome and the whites became alarmed and began
the erection of forts at various points in the county. According to Ball’s
history of Clarke County, they were located as follows:

HISTORY OF CLARKE COUNTY: OIL WELL

Bird's-Eye View of Thomasville, Alabama. Circa 1880 - 1889

For instance, they
discover that in Clarke County, some time in the centuries gone by, there was an
upheaval, ripping the county open from Section 21 (where it goes into the
Tombigbee River), Township 5 North, Range 2 East, to the same river in Township
8 North, Range 1 West.