Confederate Memorial Park

Confederate Memorial Park

Confederate Memorial Park located in Marbury, Alabama, Autauga County, tells the story of Alabama’s Confederate soldier both during the Civil War and afterwards. The park is the site of Alabama’s only Confederate Soldiers’ Home. The site operated from 1902-1939 as a haven for disabled or indigent veterans of the Confederate army, their wives, and widows. The site included 22 buildings consisting of cottages, a hospital, dairy barn, mess hall, an elaborate water and sewage system, and Memorial Hall, an administration building which held offices, a library, and a large auditorium. Features of the 102-acre memorial park site include two cemeteries, Mountain Creek Post Office, Marbury Methodist Church, nature trail, covered pavilions, museum containing artifacts from the Alabama Old Soldiers Home, uniforms, weapons, and equipment used during the Civil War. The majority of veterans served in Alabama outfits, while others moved to Alabama after the war.

White Bluff

Chalk, a soft, extremely fine-textured variety of limestone, occurs in the Coastal Plain section of west-central Alabama. Originally formed as the floor of an ancient sea, the chalk can be seen along prominent bluffs on the Tombigbee River. White Bluff is a historic site located in Demopolis, AL, which owes its character and natural beauty to the underlying chalk rocks.

Pope's Tavern | Florence Alabama

Pope’s Tavern in Florence Alabama

Pope’s Tavern, built as a stagecoach stop and tavern is now a museum on Hermitage Drive in Florence. According to the museum’s website, Andrew Jackson stayed at the inn on his way to the Battle of New Orleans.

Archeological evidence suggests that the first building burned at some point, and while no exact date of construction is known for the current building, construction of the one-and-a-half-story, eight-room, Federal-style structure began sometime in the 1830s or 1840s.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.

Andrew Ross Home

The Andrew Ross Home

Visitors to our area will soon discover new signs identifying the Andrew Ross Home, along with the Willstown Mission Cemetery and old Fort Payne Cabin Site, as official components of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The congressionally designated trail commemorates the tragic history of the 1838 removal of the Cherokee people from their ancestral homelands to territory in the west.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation.
Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.
Located just off the intersection of 45th Street and Godfrey Avenue NE, the Andrew Ross home is privately owned by Dr. Stephen Brewer. The present structure retains intact portions of the original home built in 1821 by Cherokee leader Andrew Ross and his wife, Susannah (Susan) Lowery Ross, who was the daughter of Assistant Principal Chief George Lowery. Long thought to be the home of Daniel Ross, Andrew’s father, recent research has revealed the home’s true origins. In addition to the home, which had an impressive second story balcony across the front, the property included stables, numerous outbuildings, farmlands, orchards and pastures.

Wills Valley Alabama

Wills Valley is associated with some of the earliest historical events in northern Alabama. Will’s Town, a famous Indian trading post, named for Red-Headed Will, a half-breed Cherokee chief, was founded about 1770 on Big Wills Creek, just above the present village of Lebanon, and was a place of importance in Cherokee history.