Bibb-County-Alabama

Historic Places and Ghost Towns in Bibb County Alabama

Bibb County was established in 1818 and called by the name of Cahaba. Two years later it was changed to that of Bibb, in honor of William W. Bibb, the first Governor of the State.

Bibb County was one of the largest counties in the State; but a great deal of its area has been cut off to make up the surrounding counties established later on in the history of the State.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.

Andrew Ross Home

The Andrew Ross Home

Visitors to our area will soon discover new signs identifying the Andrew Ross Home, along with the Willstown Mission Cemetery and old Fort Payne Cabin Site, as official components of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The congressionally designated trail commemorates the tragic history of the 1838 removal of the Cherokee people from their ancestral homelands to territory in the west.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation.
Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.
Located just off the intersection of 45th Street and Godfrey Avenue NE, the Andrew Ross home is privately owned by Dr. Stephen Brewer. The present structure retains intact portions of the original home built in 1821 by Cherokee leader Andrew Ross and his wife, Susannah (Susan) Lowery Ross, who was the daughter of Assistant Principal Chief George Lowery. Long thought to be the home of Daniel Ross, Andrew’s father, recent research has revealed the home’s true origins. In addition to the home, which had an impressive second story balcony across the front, the property included stables, numerous outbuildings, farmlands, orchards and pastures.

Fort Williams to Horseshoe Bend

Fort Williams was a supply depot built in early 1814 in preparation for the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. It was located in Alabama on the southeast shore where Cedar Creek met the Coosa River, near Talladega Springs. The original site was submerged under Lay Lake with the 1914 construction of the Lay Dam 14 miles downstream.

McIntosh Road

The McIntosh Road in Alabama can be followed by U.S. Route 431 (US 431), Alabama State Route 21 (SR 21), Talladega County Route 180 (CR 180), and Talladega CR 240, paralleling the Norfolk Southern Railway tracks to the Kymulga Mill And Covered Bridge.

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.

HISTORICAL SITES IN ALABAMA

In order to better provide precise information for our diverse readership, we would like to point out that we differentiate between the words “historic” and “historical.” We use “historic” in the context of describing famous or important places and events.  “Historical” is used  when describing places or events of the past that have no great significance today but may be of interest to some.

Cahaba Alabama

There are several buildings within Cahaba’s city limits that are still intact today, including its Civil War federal prison and a farmhouse built in 1841, although it is long uninhabited.