White Bluff

Chalk, a soft, extremely fine-textured variety of limestone, occurs in the Coastal Plain section of west-central Alabama. Originally formed as the floor of an ancient sea, the chalk can be seen along prominent bluffs on the Tombigbee River. White Bluff is a historic site located in Demopolis, AL, which owes its character and natural beauty to the underlying chalk rocks.

Pope's Tavern | Florence Alabama

Pope’s Tavern in Florence Alabama

Pope’s Tavern, built as a stagecoach stop and tavern is now a museum on Hermitage Drive in Florence. According to the museum’s website, Andrew Jackson stayed at the inn on his way to the Battle of New Orleans.

Archeological evidence suggests that the first building burned at some point, and while no exact date of construction is known for the current building, construction of the one-and-a-half-story, eight-room, Federal-style structure began sometime in the 1830s or 1840s.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.

Andrew Ross Home

The Andrew Ross Home

Visitors to our area will soon discover new signs identifying the Andrew Ross Home, along with the Willstown Mission Cemetery and old Fort Payne Cabin Site, as official components of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The congressionally designated trail commemorates the tragic history of the 1838 removal of the Cherokee people from their ancestral homelands to territory in the west.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation.
Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.
Located just off the intersection of 45th Street and Godfrey Avenue NE, the Andrew Ross home is privately owned by Dr. Stephen Brewer. The present structure retains intact portions of the original home built in 1821 by Cherokee leader Andrew Ross and his wife, Susannah (Susan) Lowery Ross, who was the daughter of Assistant Principal Chief George Lowery. Long thought to be the home of Daniel Ross, Andrew’s father, recent research has revealed the home’s true origins. In addition to the home, which had an impressive second story balcony across the front, the property included stables, numerous outbuildings, farmlands, orchards and pastures.

Wills Valley Alabama

Wills Valley is associated with some of the earliest historical events in northern Alabama. Will’s Town, a famous Indian trading post, named for Red-Headed Will, a half-breed Cherokee chief, was founded about 1770 on Big Wills Creek, just above the present village of Lebanon, and was a place of importance in Cherokee history.

Gaylesville Alabama

 The Gaylesville Alabama area was settled in the early 1830s, just before the removal of the Cherokee Indians. It was known originally as Sulphur Springs Alabama.

Bibb-County-Alabama

Historic Places and Ghost Towns in Bibb County Alabama

Bibb County was established in 1818 and called by the name of Cahaba. Two years later it was changed to that of Bibb, in honor of William W. Bibb, the first Governor of the State.

Bibb County was one of the largest counties in the State; but a great deal of its area has been cut off to make up the surrounding counties established later on in the history of the State.

Fort Williams to Horseshoe Bend

Fort Williams was a supply depot built in early 1814 in preparation for the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. It was located in Alabama on the southeast shore where Cedar Creek met the Coosa River, near Talladega Springs. The original site was submerged under Lay Lake with the 1914 construction of the Lay Dam 14 miles downstream.