CHEROKEE COUNTY ALABAMA

Print More
Cherokee County Alabama Map

Produced by The Cartographic Research Lab College of Arts and Sciences The University of Alabama

Cherokee County Alabama Map

Cherokee County Alabama

Return to Alabama Maps Index

Return to Alabama County Index

Cherokee County Alabama Map

Cherokee County Alabama Map

Cherokee County, Alabama population is 25,989. Its county seat is Centre, Alabama.

The county is named for the Cherokee Indian tribe.The area included in today’s Cherokee County for centuries had belonged to the Cherokee Nation of Native Americans. On December 29, 1835, however, Cherokee leaders signed the controversial Treaty of New Echota, agreeing to surrender their lands in return for new lands west of the Mississippi River.

Cherokee County is home to Weiss Lake and Little River Canyon.

Cherokee County Alabama History

The area included in today’s Cherokee County for centuries had belonged to the Cherokee Nation of Native Americans. On December 29, 1835, however, Cherokee leaders signed the controversial Treaty of New Echota, agreeing to surrender their lands in return for new lands west of the Mississippi River. This treaty contributed to the apparent theft of land from the Native Americans by the U.S. government. To this day, there are few Native Americans in Cherokee County.

On January 9, 1836, the Alabama legislature created Cherokee County with its present boundaries. Two years later, the United States government removed by force all Cherokees who had refused to leave on what would become known as the Trail of Tears.

Cherokee County Alabama Cities:

Centre, Alabama

Cherokee County was created on January 9, 1836, and named for the Cherokee people who once lived in the area. The famous Cherokee chief Pathkiller lived in Turkeytown near the present town of Centre. In 1836 the newly founded town of Cedar Bluff became the county seat, but in 1844 the county seat was moved to the more centrally located town of Centre. The name was chosen, and carries the British English spelling, because of this central location in the county.

Piedmont, Alabama

The City of Piedmont lies at the foot of the Appalachian Mountain range. Our beautiful scenery, growing local economy, and friendly populace draw thousands of visitors and settlers, every year, and make Piedmont a wonderful place to call home.

Cherokee County Alabama Towns:

Cedar Bluff, Alabama

Known as The Crappie Capital of the World, Weiss Lake hosts many local, state, and national fishing tournaments. Waters flowing from the Coosa, Little and Chattooga Rivers converge to form one of the largest freshwater lakes east of the Mississippi River and, consequently, is the central attraction for Cedar Bluff tourists, vacationers, and retirees alike.

The brilliant sunset colors dance above the calm waters of Weiss Lake, upon the banks of which rests the town of Cedar Bluff. Constructed in the early 1960’s to serve as a reservoir for hydro-electric power generation, the lake occupies over 30,200 acres and has nearly 450 miles of shoreline. It is surrounded by forest-covered mountains, an array of beaches, and natural scenic views. Many enjoy touring the area by boat, while others appreciate the ideal sporting and fishing conditions.
 

Collinsville, Alabama

Founded in the mid 1800’s by Alfred Collins and surrounded by the beautiful Appalachian Mountains of northeast Alabama, Collinsville is a great place to call home. With a current population of 1995,Collinsville has excellent schools and churches, a wonderful old southern culture, property available for new business and industry, and a Municipal Government that is committed to improving an already great town.

Your visit to Collinsville will almost certainly include a drive down shady streets lined with great old homes, a taste of southern ‘home cooking’ at one of the unique restaurants, and a friendliness seldom experienced this day and time.

Or, maybe a visit to one of the south’s oldest and largest flea markets will be the highlight of your stay – Collinsville Trade Day is held every Saturday, rain or shine, and is located at the south end of town on U.S. Highway 11. Whether you come to town for a day or for a lifetime, you’ll be welcome in Collinsville.

Gaylesville, Alabama

The area was settled in the early 1830s, just before the removal of the Cherokee Indians. It was known originally as Sulphur Springs and was an agricultural center for cotton, corn, and hay. Nearby deposits of iron ore were mined and used to produce iron at the Cornwall blast furnace, located between Gaylesville and Cedar Bluff; the iron later was used by the Confederacy during the Civil War.

Leesburg, Alabama

If you live in the Town of Leesburg, AL, you already understand all of the great things our town has to offer — from lakeside living and breathtaking mountains to the benefits of small town life. If you are planning a visit to Leesburg, you can experience all of these things too. What better outdoor vacation could you plan than relaxing on Lake Weiss, catching our world-famous crappie? Or you could be enjoying spectacular views at the Little River Canyon National Preserve, Cherokee Rock Village, or Yellow Creek Falls. Live here or just visit — we hope you enjoy every moment.
 

Sand Rock, Alabama

Sand Rock is located in western Cherokee County  atop Lookout Mountain. A portion of the town extends north into DeKalb County.  We are pleased to welcome you to the mountaintop town of Sand Rock, Alabama, situated in the Northwestern part of Cherokee County. Sand Rock has that “hometown America” atmosphere with all the character and friendliness you’d expect from a close-knit hospitable community.

The Sand Rock community has a rich history dating back to the early 1800s. It is a small town of about 500 residents located in northeast Alabama. Rich in hospitality, natural beauty, and strong family and faith traditions, Sand Rock values its rich rural heritage, strong school and community support, and strong work ethic.

Cherokee County Alabama Communities:

Broomtown, Alabama

This site has been studied for years by the history and archaeology departments of the University of Alabama. The site lies just southwest of Broomtown in the community of “Possum Hollow” and just NE of Gaylesville, Alabama. The site is rich in Indian history. There was once a village along the creek in this area. Thousands of arrowpoints, spear points, pottery shards, beads, and even the dwelling remains have been studied.

Credit: www.crghenry.org

Spring Garden, Alabama

Billy Goat Hill, Alabama

Bluffton, Alabama

Congo, Alabama

Forney, Alabama

Hopewell, Alabama

Little River, Alabama

McCord Crossroads, Alabama

Rock Run, Alabama

If you would like to become a sponsor, advertise a related location, service or vacation spot that would add to the usefulness of this site, please email us: staff@digitalalabama.com.


Export as KML for Google Earth/Google MapsOpen standalone map in fullscreen modeExport as GeoRSSExport as ARML for Wikitude Augmented-Reality browser
Cherokee County

loading map - please wait...

Little River Canyon National Preserve: 34.444255, -85.719689
Rock Run: 34.027778, -85.495278
Bluffton Alabama: 34.006944, -85.440000
Turkey Town: 34.136111, -85.691667
Collinsville, Alabama: 34.265432, -85.861523
marker icon
Get directions Open standalone map in fullscreen mode Export as KML for Google Earth/Google Maps Export as ARML for Wikitude Augmented-Reality browser
Bluffton Alabama

Bluffton Alabama
Bluffton was founded as a mining community in 1888. In 1890, Bluffton was home to approximately 8,000 residents. The Bluffton Land, Ore and Furnace Company operated an iron mine in the area, and was also responsible for building the Signal Hotel, which at one point hosted Rudyard Kipling. The Signal Hotel was the first structure in Cherokee County with electric lights. Bluffton had one newspaper, the Bluffton Mascot, and was home to a Methodist Episcopal church and Salem Baptist Church, which is still in use today. Bluffton was also the planned site of a college, The University of the Southland. A groundbreaking took place on April 24, 1889, but the college was never built. Besides the iron mines, Bluffton was home to a water works system, school, post office, and Cherokee County's first electrical generating plant. Even so, Bluffton's ore fields did not meet the expectations of their investors and higher grade iron was available closer to Birmingham. Commercial businesses began to fail, and Bluffton soon came to be considered a ghost town.

marker icon
Get directions Open standalone map in fullscreen mode Export as KML for Google Earth/Google Maps Export as ARML for Wikitude Augmented-Reality browser
Collinsville, Alabama

Collinsville, Alabama

Collinsville was once the land of the Cherokees.  Chief Big Will, a red-headed Indian chief, the son of a British agent to the Indians and a Cherokee squaw, left this area his name forever.  In his memory, Little Wills Valley is named and Little Wills Creek, both the north branch and the south branch, which meander across Little Wills Valley and through the town of Collinsville.  To the west lies Sand Mountain and to the east Lookout Mountain.  Westward through the gap in the ridge lies Big Wills Valley, also named in memory of Chief Big Will, and in Big Wills Valley, Little Wills Creek merges with Big Wills Creek and together they flow into the Coosa River.

Credit: www.collinsvillealabama.net/history.htm

The town is located in the Little Wills Valley, between Lookout Mountain to the east and the smaller Big Ridge to the west.

Jesse James was the younger brother of Alexander Franklin "Frank" James.  He is rumored to have hidden out in various locations in the northern part of the state near Gadsden in Etowah County, near Guntersville in Marshall County, and Mentone in DeKalb County.

marker icon
Get directions Open standalone map in fullscreen mode Export as KML for Google Earth/Google Maps Export as ARML for Wikitude Augmented-Reality browser
Little River Canyon National Preserve

Little River is unique because it flows for most of its length atop Lookout Mountain in northeast Alabama. Forested uplands, waterfalls, canyon rims and bluffs, pools, boulders, and sandstone cliffs offer settings for a variety of recreational activities. Natural resources and cultural heritage come together to tell the story of the Preserve, a special place in the Southern Appalachians.

Fort Payne, AL, United States
marker icon
Get directions Open standalone map in fullscreen mode Export as KML for Google Earth/Google Maps Export as ARML for Wikitude Augmented-Reality browser
Rock Run

Rock Run is an unincorporated community in Cherokee County, Alabama, United States. Rock Run is located on County Route 29, 13.6 miles southeast of Centre.

 Rock Run had its start as a mining community, and may have been named from a run on the rocks containing iron ore. According to another story, a settler climbing a hill dislodged a rock, and watching it roll down the hill, said "Look at that rock run!" A post office operated under the name Rock Run from 1883 to 1957.

Rock Run Furnace Foundations

Rock Run Furnace Foundations

marker icon
Get directions Open standalone map in fullscreen mode Export as KML for Google Earth/Google Maps Export as ARML for Wikitude Augmented-Reality browser
Turkey Town

Turkey Town is a ghost town in Cherokee County, in the U.S. state of Alabama.
The community grew up around the Cherokee town Turkeytown. A post office called Turkey Town was established in 1828, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1861. The community was named after the village, which was named in honor of the Cherokee chief Little Turkey.

 

 

Comments are closed.