Alabama-Native-American-Tribes

INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS

Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements
When Alabama was first established as part of the Mississippi Territory in the early nineteenth century, the vast majority of the land belonged to the Creek Indian Confederacy, and most of the Native American towns in Alabama were inhabited by the Creeks. The Creek Nation was divided among the group known as the Upper Creeks, who occupied territory along the Coosa, Alabama, and Tallapoosa rivers in central Alabama, and the Lower Creeks, who occupied the areas along the lower Chattahoochee, Ocmulgee, and Flint rivers in southwestern Georgia. Credits: 

Histopolis – Bollaborative Genealogy & History
Geoff Mangum’s Native America Project
Vicki Roema, Footsteps of the Cherokees (2007)
W. Stuart Harris, Dead Towns of Alabama (1977)
Aboriginal Towns in Alabama, Handbook of the Alabama Anthropological Society, 1920
Swanton, John R., Early History of the Creek Indians and Their Neighbors. Pub. Smithosian Institution, Bureau of American Enthnology, Bulletin 73.

Cherokee County Alabama Map

CHEROKEE COUNTY ALABAMA

During the Civil War, Cherokee County Alabama was a center of iron manufacturing. The famous Cherokee chief Pathkiller, who led the Cherokee in the Creek War of 1813-14, lived in Turkeytown, near the present-day town of Centre.

Introduction: The Raven

The Cherokee have an ancient saying, “The world is full of stories, and from time to time they permit themselves to be told.”

The Raven is such a story. It is a fictionalized account of true stories about a North Alabama farm boy that dreams of righting many wrongs. In this first book, Discovery, he discovers he is destined to have his dreams realized. He is to become the stuff of today’s legend and myth. He is The Raven.

A novel by Tracy O. Crane and Terry W. Platt

Oakville Indian Mounds

Oakville Indian Mounds Park and Museum

The Oakville Indian Mounds, near Moulton in central Lawrence County, may belong to the Copena Mortuary Complex, a cultural subgroup of the Woodland period marked by settlements with elaborate burial mounds containing artifacts that indicated the status of those interred.

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.

Turkeytown

Turkeytown Alabama
Turkeytown, also called Turkey’s Town, was a Native American settlement found in 1788 by the Chickamauga Cherokee chief, Little Turkey. It was the largest Cherokee town in Alabama – at one time it covered 25 miles along both banks of the Coosa River. Little Turkey built the settlement as a refuge for his people because of the ongoing hostilities between the Cherokee Indians and the whites. Turkeytown Alabama History
During the Creek War of 1813, specifically in October, the Red Stick Indians were planning an attack on Turkey Town, The Cherokee Chief at that time, Pathkiller, sent word to Andrew Jackson for help. Jackson sent a detachment let by General James White.

Cullman Alabama

Cullman Alabama
Cullman is a city in Cullman County. Cullman is located along Interstate 65, about 50 miles north of Birmingham and about 55 miles south of Huntsville. Cullman was founded by Col. Johann Gottfried Cullmann, a German refugee who came to America in 1866. While working at a bookstore in Cincinnati, Ohio, he began formulating ideas of a special colony of working people – specifically a place for immigrants from countries such as his native Germany.