Section 1 of A. J. Pickett’s “Interesting Notes upon the History of Alabama.”

Albert James Pickett

This section gives information from Colonel Jeremiah Austill, “in relation to the ‘Canoe Fight’ & other engagements in which he was concerned in the memorable years 1813, 1814.” Austill’s account includes sketches of relevant forts and waterways in southwestern Alabama. A transcript is included.
Subject:
Austill, Jeremiah, 1794-1881
Dale, Sam, 1772-1841
Creek Indians
Creek War, 1813-1814–Campaigns
Creek War, 1813-1814–Military personnel
Indians of North America–Wars

Fort Bibb

Fort Bibb Named for Alabama Territorial Governor William Wyatt Bibb, Fort Bibb was built in winter 1817-1818 to protect settlers from Creek Indian attacks. It was said to be a stockade enclosing Capt. James Saffold’s home at the Flats (Pine Flats). Col. Sam Dale helped strengthen in spring 1818 as he and his militia built […]

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee on Henry Timberlake's 1762 "Draught of the Cherokee Country"

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Alabaster Alabama Old Buck Creek Cotton Mill

Buck Creek Cotton Mill

The Buck Creek Mill (originally Selma Cotton Mill, then Siluria Cotton Mill) was a large textile mill founded in 1896, built on Buck Creek in Siluria in Shelby County. The main section of the mill building was completed in 1904, with additions in 1906 and 1911, when it took its best-known name.

Turkeytown

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.

Chief Pathkiller, was a Cherokee warrior, town chief, and Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. He also served as a colonel under Andrew Jackson in the Tennessee militia during the Creek War.

Fort Williams to Horseshoe Bend

Fort Williams was a supply depot built in early 1814 in preparation for the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. It was located in Alabama on the southeast shore where Cedar Creek met the Coosa River, near Talladega Springs. The original site was submerged under Lay Lake with the 1914 construction of the Lay Dam 14 miles downstream.

Sacred Formulas Introduction

James Mooney’s introduction to his work begins:

“The sacred formulas here given are selected from a collection of about six hundred, obtained on the Cherokee reservation in North Carolina in 1887 and 1888, and covering every subject pertaining to the daily life and thought of the Indian, including medicine, love, hunting, fishing, war, self-protection, destruction of enemies, witchcraft, the crops, the council, the ball play, etc., and, in fact, embodying almost the whole of the ancient religion of the Cherokees.”

Fort Mitchell: Fort Mitchell, Alabama | Russell County Alabama

Reconstructed Stockade of Fort Mitchell

The site of Fort Mitchell is now a park in Russell County, Alabama. The outstanding historic site features a reconstruction of the 1813 fort, historic burial grounds, a museum housing a fascinating collection of historic carriages, a restored 19th century log home and an impressive visitor center that offers exhibits, a film and a walk through the history of the site.

Fort Sinquefield

The Dog Charge At Fort Sinquifield

Fort Sinquefield Fort Sinquefield is the historic site of a wooden stockade fortification in Clarke County, Alabama, near the modern town of Grove Hill. It was built by early Clarke County pioneers as protection during the Creek War and was attacked in 1813 by Creek warriors. A marker was erected at the site by Clarke […]