Melvin's Campfire Cookin'

MELVIN’S ALABAMA HISTORY: Introduction

Melvins Alabama History with Melvin Cane (alias) has been a popular topic of discussion among his relatives for over a hundred years. Melvin was born in north Alabama in 1890 and the family discussions started when Melvin first walked off the family farm around the turn of the century.

Palos, Alabama No 3 Coal Mine Explosion, May 1910

The difficulty of the rescue work tonight is enhanced by the stygian darkness. There are no lights except miners’ lamps and a few lanterns. The mining village of Palos is all excitement tonight and the wives, daughters and friends of the entombed men present a pitiful sight as they stand above the bank of the river on the opposite side from the mine wringing their hands and crying.

Turkeytown

Turkeytown Alabama
Turkeytown, also called Turkey’s Town, was a Native American settlement found in 1788 by the Chickamauga Cherokee chief, Little Turkey. It was the largest Cherokee town in Alabama – at one time it covered 25 miles along both banks of the Coosa River. Little Turkey built the settlement as a refuge for his people because of the ongoing hostilities between the Cherokee Indians and the whites. Turkeytown Alabama History
During the Creek War of 1813, specifically in October, the Red Stick Indians were planning an attack on Turkey Town, The Cherokee Chief at that time, Pathkiller, sent word to Andrew Jackson for help. Jackson sent a detachment let by General James White.

The Man-Slayer Dies At Murder Creek

Origin of Murder Creek

About 1788, a bloody transaction occurred in the territory of the present county of Conecuh. During the revolutionary war, Colonel McGillivray formed an acquaintance with many conspicuous royalists, and, among others, with Colonel Kirkland, of South Carolina. That person was at McGillivray’s house, upon the Coosa, in 1788, with his son, his nephew, and several other gentlemen. They were on their way to Pensacola, where they intended to procure passports, and settle in the Spanish province of Louisiana. When they determined to leave his hospitable abode, McGillivray sent his servant [slave] to guide them to Pensacola.