TABLE OF CONTENTS: HISTORY OF ALABAMA AND INCIDENTALLY OF GEORGIA AND MISSISSIPPI

Growing up, Albert befriended many of the Creek and frontier traders that frequented his father’s store. From them he began to piece together the early history of the state which he later determined to put into writing.

Pickett studied law, but never practiced professionally, instead devoting his time to literature, agriculture and historical research. He traveled widely and corresponded with archivists and book dealers in the Atlantic states and Europe in order to document various parts of his history of the state. The two-volume History of Alabama was published in Charleston, South Carolina in 1851.

Chapter I: HISTORY OF ALABAMA by Albert James Pickett

CHAPTER I: History of Alabama
by Albert James Pickett
De Soto in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi
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The first discovery of Alabama was by Hernando De Soto, a native of Spain, and the son of a squire of Xerez of Badajos. When a youth he went to Peru, enlisted under Pizarro, and, with no property but his sword, won distinguished military reputation. Returning to his native country, and making an imposing appearance at Court, he was made Governor of Cuba, and Adelantado of Florida. In the unknown regions of the latter, he resolved to embark his vast wealth in a splendid expedition, designed to conquer a people whom he believed to possess more gold than he had yet beheld in South America. Young men of the best blood in Spain and Portugal, sold their houses and their vineyards and flocked to his standard.

History of Alabama Chapter XL

CHAPTER XL

REMARKABLE CANOE FIGHT–BATTLE OF HOLY GROUND– MARCH TO CAHABA OLD TOWNS. Returning again to the seat of war, in the fork of the Tombigby and Alabama, it will be seen that Colonel William McGrew advanced in pursuit of a party of the enemy, with twenty-five mounted militia. Oct. 4 1813: Coming upon them at Tallahatta, or Barshi Creek, a spirited action ensued. Colonel McGrew was killed, together with three of his company–the two Griffins and Edmund Miles–which put the remainder of the Americans to flight.

22 Janurary 1814 - Battle of Emuckfau

History of Alabama Chapter XLI

CHAPTER XLI
BATTLES OF EMUCKFAU, ENITACHOPCA AND CALBEC
Pickett’s History of Alabama – Chapter 41 – Battles of Emucfau,
Enitachopco and Calbec
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Since the battle of Talladega, Jackson had encountered innumerable difficulties and mortifications, owing to the failure of contractors and the mutiny of his troops, who were finally reduced to one hundred men by the expiration of their time of service. He was now compelled to employ Cherokees to garrison Fort Armstrong, upon the Coosahatchie, and protect the stores at Ross’s. Almost alone, in a savage land, he yet constantly rode between Fort Strother and Ditto’s Landing to hasten supplies for the new army, which he had employed Governor Blount to raise for him. At last two regiments, one of them commanded by Colonel Perkins and the other by Colonel Higgins, numbering together eight hundred and fifty men, who had only enlisted for sixty days, reached Fort Strother. Jan.

HISTORY OF ALABAMA CHAPTER XLII

Albert James Pickett: HISTORY OF ALABAMA. CHAPTER XLII. BATTLE OF THE HORSE-SHOE — WEATHERFORD SURRENDERS HIMSELF AT FORT JACKSON

March 24-27 1814: Leaving a guard at Fort Williams, General Jackson put his army, which consisted of two thousand men, upon the march. He opened a passage across the ridge which divides the Coosa and Tallapoosa, and, in three days advanced to the immediate neighborhood of the enemy. Cholocco Litabixee — the Horse-Shoe –where the Red Sticks had assembled to make a desperate defence, was admirably adapted by nature for security if well guarded, but equally for destruction if not well defended.