Indian Villages and Forts Map

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Alabama History As Told by Melvin Cane

Alabama History As Told by Melvin Cane

Indian Villages and Forts

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ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

Alabama has been the home of  indigenous peoples for thousands of years. Over 100 Indian villages and towns have been identified and research leads to believe there are many more not yet identified.

Our research is ongoing therefore you must consider there is much more to do and take into consideration that our information is incomplete and may contain errors. Research of historical documents is our primary source of information. Much of the information is followed-up with boots-on-the-ground research – but not all.

Many of the sites identified on this map are located on private property and researchers are encouraged to honor property rights and get permission for entrance on any personal property.

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Indian Villages in Alabama

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Abihka: 32.834722, -86.633333
Ochuse: 30.489482, -87.929931
Coweta Town: 32.433750, -84.992717
Ássi-lánapi: 33.306300, -86.551111
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Abihka

Abihka was one of the four mother towns of the Muscogee Creek confederacy. It is now a ceremonial ground in Okmulgee County, Alabama. Abihka is also sometimes used to refer to all Upper Creek (or Muscogee) peoples.

The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century "Chiefdom of Coosa." A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century.

The members of the Abihka were Upper Creek Indians. Their main place of residence was along the banks of the Coosa and Alabama rivers, in what is now Talladega County, Alabama. Besides the town of Abihka, the Creek had established other important towns in their territory: Abihkutchi, Tuckabutche, Talladega, Coweta, and Kan-tcati.

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Ássi-lánapi

An Upper Creek town, called Oselanopy in the Census list of 1832. It probably lay on Yellow Leaf creek, which joins Coosa River from the west about five miles below Talladega creek. From it sprang Green-leaf Town in the Indian Territory, since láni means yellow and green at the same time. Green is now more frequently expressed by páhi-láni.

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Coweta Town

The exact location of Coweta is still in disupute. Both Alabama and Georgia claim to be the home of Coweta. The location listed on this map is for the following Alabama historic marker for Coweta:

Marker ID:HCC 
Location:Brickyard Road, Phenix City, Alabama
County:Russell
Coordinates:N 32° 26.025    W 084° 59.563
 32.43375    -84.99271666
Style:Free Standing **
Waymark:None
 




Text:


Coweta Town, located east of this marker on the banks of the Chattahoochee River, is sometimes called New or Upper Coweta to distinguish it from its predecessor, Coweta Tallahassee, down river. Among other well-known Creeks, Coweta was the birthplace of William McIntosh, the controversial half-blood who was executed by his own people for having signed the fraudulent 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs. Mary Musgrove, who was such a help to James Edward Oglethorpe and the Savannah colony in Georgia, claimed Coweta ancestry. Oglethorpe visited Coweta in 1739 and negotiated an important treaty here and across the river in Cusseta Town.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Phenix City-Russell County Chamber of Commerce, 2004.

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Ochuse

A port and neighboring town, on the Gulf coast, either on Mobile or Pensacola Bay, in which the DeSoto fleet wintered, 1540. Thought to be the present Mobile Bay. (P. A. B.)

Point Clear Landing, Fairhope, AL, USA

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