Alabama-Civil-War

Civil War Timeline

Alabama Civil War Timeline
Credit: Dyer’s Compendium, Pt. 2
Battle Index—Alabama
1861
Jan. 11 Adoption of Secession Ordinance

Jan. 4 Occupation of Mt. Vernon Arsenal

1863

Jan.

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.

HISTORY OF CONECUH COUNTY

BEING A DETAILED RECORD OF EVENTS FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PRESENT; BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN MOST CONSPICUOUS IN THE ANNALS OF THE COUNTY;
A COMPLETE LIST OF THE OFFICIALS OF CONECUH, BESIDES MUCH VALUABLE INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE INTERNAL RESOURCES OF THE county.

HISTORICAL SITES IN ALABAMA

In order to better provide precise information for our diverse readership, we would like to point out that we differentiate between the words “historic” and “historical.” We use “historic” in the context of describing famous or important places and events.  “Historical” is used  when describing places or events of the past that have no great significance today but may be of interest to some.

History of Alabama Chapter XL

CHAPTER XL

REMARKABLE CANOE FIGHT–BATTLE OF HOLY GROUND– MARCH TO CAHABA OLD TOWNS. Returning again to the seat of war, in the fork of the Tombigby and Alabama, it will be seen that Colonel William McGrew advanced in pursuit of a party of the enemy, with twenty-five mounted militia. Oct. 4 1813: Coming upon them at Tallahatta, or Barshi Creek, a spirited action ensued. Colonel McGrew was killed, together with three of his company–the two Griffins and Edmund Miles–which put the remainder of the Americans to flight.

22 Janurary 1814 - Battle of Emuckfau

History of Alabama Chapter XLI

CHAPTER XLI
BATTLES OF EMUCKFAU, ENITACHOPCA AND CALBEC
Pickett’s History of Alabama – Chapter 41 – Battles of Emucfau,
Enitachopco and Calbec
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Since the battle of Talladega, Jackson had encountered innumerable difficulties and mortifications, owing to the failure of contractors and the mutiny of his troops, who were finally reduced to one hundred men by the expiration of their time of service. He was now compelled to employ Cherokees to garrison Fort Armstrong, upon the Coosahatchie, and protect the stores at Ross’s. Almost alone, in a savage land, he yet constantly rode between Fort Strother and Ditto’s Landing to hasten supplies for the new army, which he had employed Governor Blount to raise for him. At last two regiments, one of them commanded by Colonel Perkins and the other by Colonel Higgins, numbering together eight hundred and fifty men, who had only enlisted for sixty days, reached Fort Strother. Jan.