Melvin's Campfire Cookin'

MELVIN’S ALABAMA HISTORY: Introduction

Melvins Alabama History with Melvin Cane (alias) has been a popular topic of discussion among his relatives for over a hundred years. Melvin was born in north Alabama in 1890 and the family discussions started when Melvin first walked off the family farm around the turn of the century.

HISTORY OF ALABAMA CHAPTER XLII

Albert James Pickett: HISTORY OF ALABAMA. CHAPTER XLII. BATTLE OF THE HORSE-SHOE — WEATHERFORD SURRENDERS HIMSELF AT FORT JACKSON

March 24-27 1814: Leaving a guard at Fort Williams, General Jackson put his army, which consisted of two thousand men, upon the march. He opened a passage across the ridge which divides the Coosa and Tallapoosa, and, in three days advanced to the immediate neighborhood of the enemy. Cholocco Litabixee — the Horse-Shoe –where the Red Sticks had assembled to make a desperate defence, was admirably adapted by nature for security if well guarded, but equally for destruction if not well defended.

Story of the Sinking of the Alabama The Famous Confederate States Cruiser

Story of the Sinking of the Alabama
The Famous Confederate States Cruiser
Excerpt from an Interview With Captain John McIntosh Kell
Executive officer of the Alabama,

Given to Alfred Iverson Branham,
Forty-Six Years Ago,
June, 1883. The Interview was Published in The Eatonton, Georgia, Messenger, and The Atlanta Constitution, and in a London, England, Periodical, over the Nom de Plume, “Wood Holt.” The Sinking of the Alabama. After a bountiful and elegant dinner, such a one as used to grace the boards of Southern homes before the war, I cornered Captain Kell on the front porch of his house and said to him:

“Now, Captain, tell me about the Alabama’s last fight.” “After a cruise of two years,” the captain said, “during which the Alabama had driven the commerce of the United States from the seas, our ship was sadly in need of repairs.

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.