Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Neamathla, who has been one of the most distinguished of the Seminoles, and was at one time their head man, or principal chief, was by birth a Creek.

Battle Of Hobdy’s Bridge: Last Significant Indian Battle In Alabama

BATTLE OF HOBDY’S BRIDGE
 
On March 24th, 1837, the last significant Indian battle in Alabama was fought between 900 warriors of the Creek Nation and white settlers. Led by General William Wellborn, a large force of volunteers and militia left Eufaula, Alabama (then called Irwinton) to find and capture or kill the Creek Indians who had fled into the swamps following an attack on the camp where they were being held prior to their removal to present-day Oklahoma. Reaching Hobdy’s Bridge, then a long wooden span and causeway, Wellborn learned that the main party of Creeks were  camped about one mile north of the bridge. Sending part of his force up the east or Barbour County side of the Pea River under Captain Harrell, he moved up the west or Pike County side with his primary command. As he neared the site of the camp, gunfire erupted in the swamp. Wellborn defeated the refugee Creeks but had failed to surround and capture them. They fled south  down the Pea River to its confluence with the  Choctawhatchee and continued across the line into Florida. Several hundred men, women and children fled into the Pea River swamps and began and desperate attempt to make their way to Florida. Outraged over the attacks, they were determined to fight their way through if that’s what it took.

Russell County Alabama

Russell County Alabama

 

Russell County Alabama, located in the southeastern part of the state,  is a county of Alabama. Russell County, known as “The County of Forts,” because of the many forts that once existed within the county’s boundaries, including Fort Mitchell, Sand Fort, Fort Bainbridge, and a small portion of present-day Fort Benning (most of which is in Georgia).  was established by an act of the state general assembly on December 18, 1832, from lands ceded to the state by the Creek Indians, however, the final geographical boundaries did not exist until 1932. Russell County Alabama History:
Early settlement of Russell County as well as other parts of Alabama followed the establishment of Fort Mitchell. The fort was constructed by Georgia militia in 1813 during the Creek Indian War of 1813-14 to provide military protection for non-Indian expansion into Native American lands. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,947.

William Weatherford

William Weatherford
William Weatherford, known as Red Eagle (ca. 1781–March 24, 1824), was a Creek chief of the Upper Creek towns who led many of the Red Sticks actions in the Creek War (1813–1814) against Lower Creek towns and against allied forces of the United States. One of many mixed-race descendants of Southeast Indians who intermarried with European traders and later colonial settlers, William Weatherford was of mixed Creek, French, and Scots ancestry. He was raised as a Creek in the matrilineal nation and achieved his power in it, through his mother’s prominent Wind Clan (as well as his father’s trading connections. After he showed his skill as a warrior, he was given the “war name” of Hopnicafutsahia, or “Truth Teller.”

Shelby County Alabama Map

SHELBY COUNTY ALABAMA

Shelby County Alabama

Shelby County Alabama is located near the geographic center of the state of Alabama. The county seat of Shelby County is Columbiana Alabama. The county is named in honor of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky from 1792 to 1796 and again from 1812 to 1816. Shelby County Alabama History:
The original county boundaries encompassed lands acquired from the Creek Indians in the 1814 Treaty of Fort Jackson following their defeat at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The first towns in the Cahaba Valley were Wilson’s Hill (now Montevallo) and Shelbyville (now Pelham).