Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village
ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

On the east bank of the Tallapoosa River, in Randolph County, Alabama,  near the mouth of Cedar Creek. Atchinalgi was destroyed on November 13, 1813 by General James White and his troops from Tennessee.  Wikipedia contributors, “James White (general),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_White_(general)&oldid=827827679 (accessed March 20, 2018). Following the Fort Mims massacre of August 1813, Andrew Jackson and John Coffee led the Tennessee militia into northern Alabama in October of that year to engage a contingent of hostile “Red Stick” Creeks. The militiamen scored victories at the Battle of Tallushatchee (November 3) and at the Battle of Talladega (November 9).

Alabama-Ghosts-and-Ghost-Towns

Chulafinnee Alabama

Chulafinnee was a gold mining town about 12 miles south of Heflin, AL. During the boom years, it was about half the size of Arbacoochee, but had more brick buildings.
The mine filed was destroyed by one of the King brothers that were prospectors in the area.
The town was still listed on the state maps as late as 1878.

Louina Alabama Ghost Town in Randolph County Alabama

Louina Alabama

Louina Alabama was settled by the Indians, pushed to Alabama by the white settlers from the overcrowded east in the 1830s. Louina’s trading post quickly became the metropolis of its day with the area producing quantities of gold. Today Louina is a ghost town.

The James Dellet House is the only original residence remaining in Claiborne

Claiborne Alabama

Claiborne is a ghost town on a bluff above the Alabama River in Monroe County, Alabama.
Situated near the Federal Road, Claiborne began during the Mississippi Territory period with a ferry over the river.

Historic Downtown Opelika

Opelika Alabama

Downtown Opelika features Historic Railroad Avenue, where you can hear the whistles blow and enjoy the rumblings of trains as they travel through the city. The beautiful courtyard and fountain in Lee County Courthouse Square is the site of a variety of special events. History abounds at The Museum of East Alabama.

Creek-Indian-Tribe-of-Alabama

CREEK INDIAN TRIBE OF ALABAMA

ALABAMA CREEK INDIAN TRIBES
NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES OF ALABAMA INDEX
Muscogee Creek Nation Alabama
Also called the Muscogee, the Creek were made up of several separate tribes that occupied Georgia and Alabama in the American Colonial Period. One of the Five Civilized Tribes, they formed the Creek Confederacy with other Muscogean speaking tribes, the Alabama, Hitchiti, and Coushatta. Their confederacy, which formed the largest division of the Muscogean family, included other Muscogean tribes such as the Catawba, Iroquois, and Shawnee, as well as the Cherokee. Their confederacy, which formed the largest division of the Muscogean family, included other Muscogean tribes such as the Catawba, Iroquois, and Shawnee, as well as the Cherokee. The Creeks were the largest, most important Indian group living in Alabama.