Sloss Furnaces

Sloss Furnaces

A total of 47 workers lost their lives and numerous others lost their ability to work due to horrific accidents, including an explosion that left six blind. The rumor is that workers, fed up with their daunting and dangerous nights, fed Slag into the furnace in October of 1906.

Alabama-Ghosts-and-Ghost-Towns

HAUNTED PLACES IN ALABAMA

Would you dare venture to any one of these? Weird sightings and occurrences at so called“haunted” placess is mere theatrics compared to Alabama’s gruesome and terrifying haunted settings.

Haunted Chicken House in Heflin Alabama

Haunted Chicken House
7522 US Hwy 431
Heflin AL

 

A row of hearses, some with metal chickens artwork, are lined up along Hwy 431 in Heflin Alabama. They serve as the road sign to let you know you are approaching the Haunted Chicken House. From I-20, exit 191, go south on Hwy 431 for eight miles until you see the hearses and chickens artwork on the right. The hauned chicken house is open in October but the hearses and chickens are year round. Alabama Ghosts and Ghost Towns Index

Alabama-Ghosts-and-Ghost-Towns

Albertville Alabama Avenue Middle School

Albertville Alabama Avenue Middle School
At night you will hear doors slamming and see lights flickering on and off. You’ll lock your locker, leave and then walk back to your locker to find it unlocked. You’ll also hear kids in the hallway and no one is there. For more ghost tales see Alabama Ghosts and Ghost Towns Index. Looking for haunts?

Alabama-Ghosts-and-Ghost-Towns

Montgomery Alabama’s Haunted Baseball Field

Montgomery Alabama’s Haunted Baseball Field
The Montgomery Military Prison was established in a cotton warehouse in the Spring of 1862, after the battle of Shiloh. The cotton shed was situated between Tallapoosa Street and the Alabama River. It housed more than 700 Federal prisoners, most of which were captured in southeastern Tennessee, Shiloh.  198 men, most listed as unknown, died at the Montgomery Military Prison from April to December of 1862. The survivors were moved to Tuscaloosa, Alabama in December 1862. A portion of Oakwood cemetery was designated for those Federal prisoners to be buried.