Paintrock Alabama early 20th Century

Yuchi Gold Of Paint Rock Alabama

One of Alabama’s most famous lost gold stories is the Yuchi Gold of Paint Rock Valley.

Legend says that somewhere just southeast of Huntsville, Alabama there is a fortune in gold hidden in a cave. According to the legend, the cave has gold ingots stacked within. This Alabama Treasure Legend speculates that the gold came from Spanish soldiers who were killed near Tuscaloosa Alabama by the Yuchi tribe around 1699.

The Last Long Ride: Wilson’s Selma Raid

Alabama Civil War Timeline: March 22, 1865

An officer at the scene later remembered, “Never can I forget the brilliant scene, as regiment after regiment filed gaily out of camp, decked in all the paraphernalia of war, with gleaming arms, and guidons given to the wanton breeze.”

Alabama-Civil-War

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR INDEX

Alabama declared that it had seceded from the United States of America on January 11, 1861. It then quickly joined the Confederate States during the American Civil War. A slave state, Alabama provided a significant source of troops and leaders, military material, supplies, food, horses and mules; however, very little of the state’s cotton crop could be sold, as the main port of Mobile was closed off by the U.S. Navy.

Bon Secour Salt Factory Drawing by Hazel and Richard Brough from the book “Food, Fun, and Fable.”

Alabama Civil War Site: Bon Secour Salt Works

Alabama Civil War Timeline
September 8, 1864
Union Troops Destory Bon Secour Salt Works

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE
Baldwin County Alabama contributed to the Confederate Civil War activities through production of salt from the Bon Secour Salt Works which went into production in early 1863. The salt production facility was was comprised of long open sheds with a brick firebox running down the center of the shed. Iron containers positioned along the fire box and were heated by a fire and as the hot air traveled through a fire box, it boiled the brine solution in the pots leaving the salt to be collected. The brine was taken from pits dug into the area’s salt marshlands. 
In September, 1864, Union troops proceeded to Bon Secour to destroy the salt works. Captain C.W. Stone of the 6th Michigan Volunteers recorded that forces under his command destroyed 990 of the iron vats and hauled away 30,000 feet of lumber. In his official report, Captain Stone mentioned that his forces burned all that was left behind at Bon Secour including

“a number of buildings having been constructed by the Confederate forces as quarters for soldiers, the place being known as Camp Anderson.”

 

On September 8, 1864, a combined army-navy raiding party led by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant George Wiggin, USN, left the Fort Morgan anchorage at 7:00 a.m. Wiggin commanded three naval gunboats, the USS Tritonia, the USS Rodolph, and the USS Stockdale and one army transport, the steamer Planter, which had two barges in tow.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: September 11, 1864

Alabama Civil War Timeline
September 11, 1864
Expedition Up Fish River At Mobile Bay
Acting Lieutenant Wiggin led an expedition up Fish River at Mobile Bay to seize an engine used by Confederates in a sawmill and to assist Union soldiers in obtaining lumber. Tinclad U.S.S. Rodolph, Acting Lieutenant George D. Upham, and wooden side-wheeler U.S.S. Stockdale, Acting Master Spiro V. Bennis, with Wiggin embarked, convoyed Army transport Planter to Smith’s mill, where they took the engine, 60,000 feet of lumber, and some livestock. Loading the lumber on board a barge in tow of Planter took almost until nightfall, and in the dusk of the return down-stream, Confederate riflemen took the ships under fire and felled trees ahead of them. The gun-boats returned the fire rapidly and Rodolph broke through the obstructions, enabling the remaining ships to pass downriver.  

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Noccalula Falls Park | Gadsden AL | Etowah County Alabama

Noccalula Falls Park

Noccalula Falls Park
ALABAMA WATERFALLS MAIN PAGE

Noccalula Falls Park is a 250-acre public park located in Gadsden, Alabama. Noccalula Falls Address:
1500 Noccalula Road
Gadsden, AL 35904
Phone: 256-549-4663
Noccalula Falls Directions:
Noccalula Falls Cabins
 

The falls are located on land once owned by R.A. Mitchell, who gave the site to the city of Gadsden, so that the area could be improved, and the public could enjoy the falls. R.A. Mitchell Elementary School, named in his honor, is located across the street from the falls. The main feature of the park is a notable 90-foot (27-m) waterfall with a gorge trail winding through its basin and past caves, an aboriginal fort, an abandoned dam, pioneer homestead, and Civil War carvings. The park also features a petting zoo, mini-golf course, the Gilliland-Reese Covered Bridge (built 1899) and a replica 1863 C. P. Huntington train ride.

Fourth Alabama Infantry Regiment

Alabama Civil War Index


Fourth Alabama Infantry Regiment
This regiment was organized at Dalton, Georgia, May 2, 1861, and proceeded at once to Virginia. Mustered into service for twelve months at Lynchburg, May 7, it proceeded to Harper’s Ferry. It soon after fell back to Winchester, where it became part of Gen. B. E. Bee’s Brigade – of which the 2nd and 11th Mississippi, 1st Tennessee, and 6th North Carolina were the other regiments. Moved to Manassas Junction, the regiment took a prominent part in that conflict, losing 38 killed and 208 wounded out of a total of about 750 engaged. Gen. Bee, killed at Manassas, was succeeded by Gen. W.H.C. Whiting.