Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama
May 4, 1865
Citronelle, Alabama

At the wars end Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor held command of the administrative entity called the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, with some 12,000 troops. Mobile, Alabama had fallen to Union forces in April of 1865 and Taylor had received news of General Johnston’s surrender to Union General Sherman. Taylor agreed to meet Union Major General E.R.S. Canby for a conference a few miles north of Mobile at Magee Farm, in the town of Kushla, on April 30th at which time they established a truce, terminable after 48 hours notice by either party. The Confederate general arrived at Magee Farm on a handcar propelled by two African Americans. A single officer, Colonel William Levy, accompanied them. General Canby, on the other hand, reached the meeting place accompanied by his staff in dress uniforms, a full brigade of Union troops and a military band. The two generals met 20 miles further north at Citronelle in Mobile County on May 4, 1865.

Cullman Alabama

Cullman Alabama
Cullman is a city in Cullman County. Cullman is located along Interstate 65, about 50 miles north of Birmingham and about 55 miles south of Huntsville. In the time before European settlement, the area that today includes Cullman was originally in the territory of the Cherokee Nation. Cullman Alabama History
The region was traversed by a trail known as the Black Warrior’s Path1, which led from the Tennessee River near the present location of Florence, Alabama, to a point on the Black Warrior River south of Cullman. This trail figured significantly in Cherokee history, and it featured prominently in the American Indian Wars prior to the establishment of the state of Alabama and the relocation of several American Indian tribes, including the Creek people westward along the Trail of Tears.

CSS Jamestown (1861 - 1862) | Also known as Thomas Jefferson

Thomas L. Harrison | Battle Of Mobile Bay Hero

 
Obituary Notice for Thomas L. Harrison
At Mobile, Thomas L. Harrison, the hero on the confederate side in the Battle of Mobile Bay, died Friday night, aged fifty-one years.  He graduated from Annapolis, and at the age of twenty years, he entered the confederate naval service. He was ordered to Mobile in 1862 and appointed executive office for the gunboat Morgan.  

In the battle in the spring of 1865, when Farragut forced an entrance into Mobile Bay, the little vessel was soon driven under the shelter of the guns of Fort Morgan, the ram

 

Tennessee and the gunboat Selma having been captured and the gunboat Gaines burned.  

The captain of the Morgan gave orders to abandon the ship and set her on fire.  Lieutenant Harrison, however, reminding the crew that this was the only free vessel in the bay and would be of incalculable value to the confederacy if saved, asked the men to volunteer to run the boat up to Mobile.  Every man stepped to the starboard. Thereupon Harrison requested the captain to step below.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: September 11, 1864

Acting Lieutenant Wiggin led an expedition up Fish River at Mobile Bay to seize an engine used by Confederates in a sawmill and to assist Union soldiers in obtaining lumber. Tinclad U.S.S. Rodolph, Acting Lieutenant George D. Upham, and wooden side-wheeler U.S.S. Stockdale, Acting Master Spiro V. Bennis, with Wiggin embarked, convoyed Army transport Planter to Smith’s mill, where they took the engine, 60,000 feet of lumber, and some livestock. Loading the lumber on board a barge in tow of Planter took almost until nightfall, and in the dusk of the return down-stream, Confederate riflemen took the ships under fire and felled trees ahead of them. The gun-boats returned the fire rapidly and Rodolph broke through the obstructions, enabling the remaining ships to pass downriver.  

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Bon Secour Salt Factory Drawing by Hazel and Richard Brough from the book “Food, Fun, and Fable.”

Alabama Civil War Site: Bon Secour Salt Works

Bon Secour Salt Works

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE
Baldwin County Alabama contributed to the Confederate Civil War activities through production of salt from the Bon Secour Salt Works which went into production in early 1863. The salt production facility was was comprised of long open sheds with a brick firebox running down the center of the shed. Iron containers positioned along the fire box and were heated by a fire and as the hot air traveled through a fire box, it boiled the brine solution in the pots leaving the salt to be collected. The brine was taken from pits dug into the area’s salt marshlands. 
In September, 1864, Union troops proceeded to Bon Secour to destroy the salt works. Captain C.W. Stone of the 6th Michigan Volunteers recorded that forces under his command destroyed 990 of the iron vats and hauled away 30,000 feet of lumber. In his official report, Captain Stone mentioned that his forces burned all that was left behind at Bon Secour including

“a number of buildings having been constructed by the Confederate forces as quarters for soldiers, the place being known as Camp Anderson.”

 

On September 8, 1864, a combined army-navy raiding party led by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant George Wiggin, USN, left the Fort Morgan anchorage at 7:00 a.m. Wiggin commanded three naval gunboats, the USS Tritonia, the USS Rodolph, and the USS Stockdale and one army transport, the steamer Planter, which had two barges in tow.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: March 22, 1865

Union Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson crosses the rain-swollen Tennessee River at Gravelly Springs in Lauderdale County, Alabama. Maj. Gen. James Harrison Wilson, U.S. Army, assembled the largest cavalry force ever massed in the western hemisphere. Five divisions totaling 22,000 camped from Gravelly Springs westward to Waterloo, Alabama.

Civil War Sites In Alabama

Alabama Civil War Sites Map

Alabama Civil War Sites Map
Civil War in Alabama
Alabama soldiers fought in hundreds of battles; the state’s losses at Gettysburg were 1,750 dead plus even more captured or wounded; the famed “Alabama Brigade” took 781 casualties. Governor Lewis E. Parsons in July 1861 made a preliminary estimate of losses. Nearly all the white men served, some 122,000 he said, of whom 35,000 died in the war and another 30,000 were seriously disabled. The next year Governor Robert M. Patton estimated that 20,000 veterans had returned home permanently disabled, and there were 20,000 widows and 60,000 orphans. With cotton prices low, the value of farms shrank, from $176 million in 1860 to only $64 million in 1870.