April 28 1862: Skirmish at Paint Rock Bridge

The Skirmish at Paint Rock Bridge was an action fought between a Union Army detachment of 27 men guarding a bridge near Woodville, Alabama and a Confederate States Army cavalry detachment intent on destroying the railroad bridge on April 28, 1862 during the American Civil War.

Fort Harker Stevenson Depot

Fort Harker

Fort Harker was built to defend a strategic position captured by Union troops in northeastern Alabama. Situated atop a hill east of the town of Stevenson, it was constructed in the summer of 1862 by soldiers and freed slaves of the Army of the Cumberland.

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Alabama Civil War Sites

 
Alabama Civil War Sites

Battle of Athens

Battle of Day’s Gap

Battle of Crooked Creek

Battle of Decatur

Battle of Fort Blakely

Battle of Mobile Bay

Battle of Newton

Battle of Ebenezer Church
The Battle of Ebenezer Church, which took place on April 1, 1865, was an engagement in the American Civil War (1861-1865). Near Ebenezer Church in present-day Stanton, Chilton County (Bibb County at the time). Battle of Selma

Battle of Munford

Battle of Sulphur Creek Trestle

Battle of Spanish Fort

Listed Alphabetically by Location
 

Alabama Seceded Jan. 11, 1861. ANTIOCH CHURCH, Skirmish near, Aug.

1st Alabama Regiment Cavalry

The 1st Alabama Cavalry was raised from Alabama Unionists at Huntsville, Alabama and Memphis, Tennessee in October, 1862 after Federal troops occupied the area. It was attached to the XVI Corps in various divisions until November 1864, when it became part of the XV Corps. During this time, its duties mostly consisted of scouting, raiding, reconnaissance, flank guard, and providing screening to the infantry while on the march.

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ALABAMA CIVIL WAR INDEX

Alabama declared that it had seceded from the United States of America on January 11, 1861. It then quickly joined the Confederate States during the American Civil War. A slave state, Alabama provided a significant source of troops and leaders, military material, supplies, food, horses and mules; however, very little of the state’s cotton crop could be sold, as the main port of Mobile was closed off by the U.S. Navy.