Map of the Alabama and Tennessee River Railroad between Blue Mountain Station and Jacksonville, Calhoun County Alabama

Blue Mountain Alabama

 

Compiled in 1921 by Thomas McAdory Owen, LL.D.
Post office and station at the crossing of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and the Southern Railway; in the northern suburbs of Anniston, 2 miles from the center of the city. It is one of the cotton-mill and iron-mining sections of the city of Anniston. Population: 1910-528. The locality was settled by the Hudgins family in the late thirties and for years was the terminus of the Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad, being the shipping station for the Oxford furnace. During the War, the Confederate Government operated both the railroad and the furnace, the iron being shipped to Selma to make “Ironclads” for the Confederacy.

Contemporary Newspaper view of the Union fleet passing Port Hudson published by Harper's Weekly Newspaper April 18, 1863.

Company K First Alabama Regiment – THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE CHAPTER VII

During the negotiations for the surrender, Gen. Banks refused to grant terms permitting the release of the prisoners on parole, on the ground that orders from Washington positively forbade it. On the day of surrender, however, he suddenly changed his mind and decided to parole all enlisted men, retaining the officers.

Battle of Crooked Creek

After repulsing Forrests attack at Day’s Gap in the early morning hours Streight’s “Mule Brigade” continued south about 6 miles until reaching Crooked Creek. At Crooked Creek Forrest’s Cavalry again engaged the rear guards of the Federal column. From Col. Streight’s Report:

“It was now about 11 o’clock, fighting having continued since about 6 o’clock in the morning. I had learned, in the mean time, that the enemy were in heavy force, fully three times our number, with twelve pieces of artillery, under General Forrest in person; consequently I was fearful that they were making an effort to get around us and attack in the rear of our position; hence I decided to resume the march.

Map: Day’s Gap Battlefield

On April 30 at Day’s Gap on Sand Mountain, Forrest caught up with Streight’s expedition and attacked his rear guard. Streight’s men managed to repulse this attack and as a result they continued their march to avoid any further delays and envelopments caused by the Confederate troops.

Alabama-Civil-War

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR INDEX

Alabama declared that it had seceded from the United States of America on January 11, 1861. It then quickly joined the Confederate States during the American Civil War. A slave state, Alabama provided a significant source of troops and leaders, military material, supplies, food, horses and mules; however, very little of the state’s cotton crop could be sold, as the main port of Mobile was closed off by the U.S. Navy.

Company K First Alabama Regiment – THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE CHAPTER VI

CHAPTER VI.

Siege and surrender of port Hudsonthe investment-SKIRMISHING-THE FIRST GRAND ASSAULT

ASSAILED AND ASSAILANTS-DOUBLY ARMED-LIEUT.

PRATT AT BATTERY II-THE ESSEX DRIVEN OFF-

LIEUT. ADAMS ELECTED-ARTILLERY PRACTICE-AS SAULT OF JUNE I4TH-EFFECT OF BUCK AND BALL-

BANKS INHUMANITY-LEAD FOR WATER-A GALLANT

CORPORAL-BATTERY I I SILENCED-GALLANT SCHUR-

MURS DEATH-THE SUNKEN BATTERY-MULE AND

PEAS-THE FALL OF VICKSBURG-UNCONDITIONAL

SURRENDER-GEN. GARDNERS SWORD-CASUALTIES

OF THE FIRST.

Alabama-Treasure-Legends

ALABAMA TREASURE LEGENDS

Some sites listed here may have prohibitions against prospecting. Always seek permission from property owners and obtain any necessary permits prior to treasure hunting, panning, dredging, or metal detecting.

THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: Chapter V

THREE YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE SERVICE: Chapter V

Col. Steadman at once began a strict system of discipline and drill. The following was the order of the day: Reveille at daybreak with roll-call, inspection of arms and policing of camps; 6 a. m., drill in the school of the soldier; 7 A. M., breakfast; 8.30 a. m., guard mounting; 9 A. m., non-commissioned officers’ drill; 10 a. m., drill in the school of the company; 12 m., dinner; 1 p. m., skirmish drill; 3 p. m., battalion drill; 5 p. m., dress parade; sunset, retreat; 9 P.M., taps. Companies assigned to batteries drilled at the guns at the hours for the company drill. Strict regimental guard was kept up, all the requirements of the army regulations being enforced.