Bon Secour Salt Factory Drawing by Hazel and Richard Brough from the book “Food, Fun, and Fable.”

Alabama Civil War Site: Bon Secour Salt Works

Alabama Civil War Timeline
September 8, 1864
Union Troops Destory Bon Secour Salt Works

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE
Baldwin County Alabama contributed to the Confederate Civil War activities through production of salt from the Bon Secour Salt Works which went into production in early 1863. The salt production facility was was comprised of long open sheds with a brick firebox running down the center of the shed. Iron containers positioned along the fire box and were heated by a fire and as the hot air traveled through a fire box, it boiled the brine solution in the pots leaving the salt to be collected. The brine was taken from pits dug into the area’s salt marshlands. 
In September, 1864, Union troops proceeded to Bon Secour to destroy the salt works. Captain C.W. Stone of the 6th Michigan Volunteers recorded that forces under his command destroyed 990 of the iron vats and hauled away 30,000 feet of lumber. In his official report, Captain Stone mentioned that his forces burned all that was left behind at Bon Secour including

“a number of buildings having been constructed by the Confederate forces as quarters for soldiers, the place being known as Camp Anderson.”

 

On September 8, 1864, a combined army-navy raiding party led by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant George Wiggin, USN, left the Fort Morgan anchorage at 7:00 a.m. Wiggin commanded three naval gunboats, the USS Tritonia, the USS Rodolph, and the USS Stockdale and one army transport, the steamer Planter, which had two barges in tow.

Alabama Civil War Timeline: September 11, 1864

Alabama Civil War Timeline
September 11, 1864
Expedition Up Fish River At Mobile Bay
Acting Lieutenant Wiggin led an expedition up Fish River at Mobile Bay to seize an engine used by Confederates in a sawmill and to assist Union soldiers in obtaining lumber. Tinclad U.S.S. Rodolph, Acting Lieutenant George D. Upham, and wooden side-wheeler U.S.S. Stockdale, Acting Master Spiro V. Bennis, with Wiggin embarked, convoyed Army transport Planter to Smith’s mill, where they took the engine, 60,000 feet of lumber, and some livestock. Loading the lumber on board a barge in tow of Planter took almost until nightfall, and in the dusk of the return down-stream, Confederate riflemen took the ships under fire and felled trees ahead of them. The gun-boats returned the fire rapidly and Rodolph broke through the obstructions, enabling the remaining ships to pass downriver.  

ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Fourth Alabama Infantry Regiment

Alabama Civil War Index


Fourth Alabama Infantry Regiment
This regiment was organized at Dalton, Georgia, May 2, 1861, and proceeded at once to Virginia. Mustered into service for twelve months at Lynchburg, May 7, it proceeded to Harper’s Ferry. It soon after fell back to Winchester, where it became part of Gen. B. E. Bee’s Brigade – of which the 2nd and 11th Mississippi, 1st Tennessee, and 6th North Carolina were the other regiments. Moved to Manassas Junction, the regiment took a prominent part in that conflict, losing 38 killed and 208 wounded out of a total of about 750 engaged. Gen. Bee, killed at Manassas, was succeeded by Gen. W.H.C. Whiting.

Battle of Ebenezer Church

The Battle of Ebenezer Church was a civil war battle fought between Confederate cavalry under Nathan Bedford Forrest’s leadership and a well-supplied Union force under the command of Union Maj. Gen. Hohn H. Wilson that had just triumphantly swept across Alabama virtually unopposed.

Confederate Memorial Park

Confederate Memorial Park

Confederate Memorial Park located in Marbury, Alabama, Autauga County, tells the story of Alabama’s Confederate soldier both during the Civil War and afterwards. The park is the site of Alabama’s only Confederate Soldiers’ Home. The site operated from 1902-1939 as a haven for disabled or indigent veterans of the Confederate army, their wives, and widows. The site included 22 buildings consisting of cottages, a hospital, dairy barn, mess hall, an elaborate water and sewage system, and Memorial Hall, an administration building which held offices, a library, and a large auditorium. Features of the 102-acre memorial park site include two cemeteries, Mountain Creek Post Office, Marbury Methodist Church, nature trail, covered pavilions, museum containing artifacts from the Alabama Old Soldiers Home, uniforms, weapons, and equipment used during the Civil War. The majority of veterans served in Alabama outfits, while others moved to Alabama after the war.

CSS-Tennessee Confederate Ironclad Ram

CSS Tennessee

CSS Tennessee was a casemate ironclad ram built for the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. She served as the flagship of Admiral Franklin Buchanan, commander of the Mobile Squadron, after her commissioning. She was captured in 1864 by the Union Navy during the Battle of Mobile Bay and then participated in the Union’s subsequent Siege of Fort Morgan. Tennessee was decommissioned after the war and sold in 1867 for scrap. ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Made in Alabama Index

Battery Duportail located inside Fort Morgan Alabama

Battery Duportail

Battery Duportail

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE

BATTLEFIELDS AND FORTS MAIN PAGE
ALABAMA CIVIL WAR MAIN PAGE

Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail was a reinforced concrete, Endicott Period 12 inch coastal gun battery on Fort Morgan , Baldwin County, Alabama. The battery was named in G.O. 78, 15 May 1903 after Maj. Gen. Louis L. Duportail, Chief of Engineers (1777-1783), Continental Army, who served with distinction during the Revolutionary War and who died at sea in 1802 while en route to France. Battery construction started in 1898, was completed in 1900 and transferred to the Coast Artillery for use 3 Jun 1900 at a cost of $ 172,646.05. Declared surplus in 1931.