William Weatherford

William Weatherford
William Weatherford, known as Red Eagle (ca. 1781–March 24, 1824), was a Creek chief of the Upper Creek towns who led many of the Red Sticks actions in the Creek War (1813–1814) against Lower Creek towns and against allied forces of the United States. One of many mixed-race descendants of Southeast Indians who intermarried with European traders and later colonial settlers, William Weatherford was of mixed Creek, French, and Scots ancestry. He was raised as a Creek in the matrilineal nation and achieved his power in it, through his mother’s prominent Wind Clan (as well as his father’s trading connections. After he showed his skill as a warrior, he was given the “war name” of Hopnicafutsahia, or “Truth Teller.”

Oxford Alabama

Oxford Alabama

Whether a first time home buyer or seasoned retiree, Oxford is a special place to live. Oxford’s mild climate allows participation in outdoor activities all year round, a big plus if golf or tennis is your game.

Residents will tell you that Oxford is a great place for families. Children attend award-winning schools and have opportunities to participate in a variety of after-school activities. With several athletic programs to choose from, it’s clear that children can experience a variety of activities while growing up in Oxford.

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Anatitchapko : Creek Indian Village

Anatitchapko : Creek Indian Village
Alabama Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements Index Page

Located in Clay County, Alabama. As with many native American names, people and places, history is full of various spellings for the same person or place. Anatitchapko. Anatitchapko has been known as  Au-net-techap-co, Enitachopka, Enitachopko, Enotochopco, Enotochopko, Enitachopco and Long Swamp. The Battle of Enitachopco occurred only two days after General Andrew Jackson’s victory over the Red Sticks in the Battle of Emuckfau.

Montevallo-Alabama

Montevallo Alabama

The area where Montevallo is now was once controlled by the Creek Indians. After being acquired in 1814 Jesse Wilson claimed a small hill on the northern bank of the Shoal Creek and created a homestead there, making it the oldest settlement in Shelby County. Wilson’s friends and family followed afterwards and also settled in the area, and a settlement known as Wilson’s Hill developed on the site. The settlement’s location at almost the exact center of Alabama meant it was considered one of the potential sites for the University of Alabama. In an attempt to encourage the university to choose the site the settlement changed its name to Montevallo, which is Italian for the hill in the valley.