Abihka

Abihka
“Abihka” has been used as the name of a town, one of the four mother towns of the Muscogee Creek confederacy, and sometimes as a name used to refer to all Upper Creek (or Muscogee) peoples. The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.” A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century. Abihka History and Origins
The Abihka were the remnants of the 16th century “Chiefdom of Coosa.” A remnant of the Natchez people settled with the Abihka after being dispersed by the French in the 18th century. Abihka Etymology
The name “Abihka” (meaning unknown), is sometimes used to refer to all the Upper Creek peoples.

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village

Atchinalgi : Creek Indian Village
ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

On the east bank of the Tallapoosa River, in Randolph County, Alabama,  near the mouth of Cedar Creek. Atchinalgi was destroyed on November 13, 1813 by General James White and his troops from Tennessee.  Wikipedia contributors, “James White (general),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_White_(general)&oldid=827827679 (accessed March 20, 2018). Following the Fort Mims massacre of August 1813, Andrew Jackson and John Coffee led the Tennessee militia into northern Alabama in October of that year to engage a contingent of hostile “Red Stick” Creeks. The militiamen scored victories at the Battle of Tallushatchee (November 3) and at the Battle of Talladega (November 9).

Alabama History As Told by Melvin Cane

Indian Villages Map

Indian Villages in Alabama
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ALABAMA INDIAN VILLAGES, TOWNS AND SETTLEMENTS INDEX PAGE

Alabama has been the home of  indigenous peoples for thousands of years. Over 100 Indian villages and towns have been identified and research leads to believe there are many more not yet identified. Our research is ongoing therefore you must consider there is much more to do and take into consideration that our information is incomplete and may contain errors. Research of historical documents is our primary source of information. Much of the information is followed-up with boots-on-the-ground research – but not all.