Tallassee on Henry Timberlake's 1762 "Draught of the Cherokee Country"

Tallassee Alabama

Tallassee (also “Talassee,” “Talisi,” “Tellassee,” and various similar spellings) is a prehistoric and historic Native American site in Blount County and Monroe County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Tallassee was the southernmost of a string of Overhill Cherokee villages that spanned the lower Little Tennessee River in the 18th century. Although it receives scant attention in primary historical accounts, Tallassee is one of the few Overhill towns to appear on every major 18th-century map of the Little Tennessee Valley.

Creek War Battle Sites

Creek War Battle Sites in Alabama
The Creek War (1813–1814), also known as the Red Stick War and the Creek Civil War, was a regional war between opposing Creek factions, European empires and the United States, taking place largely in today’s Alabama and along the Gulf Coast. The war of began as a civil war, largely centered among the Upper Creeks, whose towns were located on the Coosa, Tallapoosa, and upper reaches of the Alabama rivers. The major conflicts of the war took place between state militia units and the “Red Stick” Creeks. Introduction

In the early part of the sixteenth century, white explorers who visited the territory now forming the southeastern United States found it occupied by tribes of American Indians who had lived there for centuries. The Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Chickasaw, and Choctaw Indians saw the land they inhabited become an object of desire for the visitors.

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.

The Dog Charge At Fort Sinquifield

Fort Sinquefield

Fort Sinquefield is the historic site of a wooden stockade fortification in Clarke County, Alabama, near the modern town of Grove Hill. It was built by early Clarke County pioneers as protection during the Creek War and was attacked in 1813 by Creek warriors. A marker was erected at the site by Clarke County school children in 1931 and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 31, 1974. At the time of the Creek War, originally a civil war within the Creek nation, Clarke was a newly formed county in the Mississippi Territory. The Creek were divided between traditionalists in the Upper Towns and those who had adopted more European-American customs in the Lower Towns.

Battery Duportail located inside Fort Morgan Alabama

Battery Duportail

Battery Duportail

BALDWIN COUNTY MAIN PAGE

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Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail (1901-1931) – Battery Duportail was a reinforced concrete, Endicott Period 12 inch coastal gun battery on Fort Morgan , Baldwin County, Alabama. The battery was named in G.O. 78, 15 May 1903 after Maj. Gen. Louis L. Duportail, Chief of Engineers (1777-1783), Continental Army, who served with distinction during the Revolutionary War and who died at sea in 1802 while en route to France. Battery construction started in 1898, was completed in 1900 and transferred to the Coast Artillery for use 3 Jun 1900 at a cost of $ 172,646.05. Declared surplus in 1931.

Trail Of Tears National Historic Trail

Fort Likens Site

Ft. Likens

Fort  Likens was established at Barry Springs in northern Cherokee County. All Cherokee Indians including men, women and children living in the area surrounding the fort would have been rounded up and held there until  they were sent to Fort Payne. Ft. Likens housed the federal troops responsible for rounding up the Cherokees on May, 24, 1838 and placing them in an internment camp located nearby at Barry Springs where they were held until they were transported to Indian Territory (present day Oklahoma) on the infamous Trail of Tears.

Fort Morgan, Mobile Point, Alabama, 1864, showing damage to the south side of the fort.

The Battle of Mobile Bay and Siege of Fort Morgan

The Siege of Fort Morgan occurred during the American Civil War as part of the battle for Mobile Bay in 1864. Union ground forces led by General Gordon Granger conducted a short siege of the Confederate garrison at the mouth of Mobile Bay under the command of General Richard L. Page. The Confederate surrender helped shut down Mobile as an effective Confederate port city.  

Admiral David Farragut had defeated the Confederate navy in Mobile Bay on August 5 and Fort Gaines, guarding the western approach to the bay, had surrendered to the cooperating Union land forces under Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger.