METAL DETECTING IN ALABAMA Disclaimer and Laws

The information posted here is based on personal experiences and research of the author(s). The author(s) suggest that the reader check with local authorities before beginning a dig where there is any question regarding ownership of the site, ordinances or special restrictions regarding metal detecting or digging on public land, or removal or sale of archaeological finds.

St Clair County Alabama Map

ST CLAIR COUNTY ALABAMA

St. Clair County was established on November 20, 1818 by the Alabama Territory legislature by splitting the area from Shelby County. In 1836, a portion of St. Clair County was separated to establish Cherokee County and DeKalb County. In 1866, after the Civil War, a northeast section of the county was used to create Etowah County.

Shelby County Alabama Map

SHELBY COUNTY ALABAMA

Shelby County Alabama is located near the geographic center of the state of Alabama. The county seat of Shelby County is Columbiana Alabama. The county is named in honor of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky from 1792 to 1796 and again from 1812 to 1816.

TALLADEGA COUNTY ALABAMA

Talladega County Alabama

Talladega County is a county of the state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 82,291. Its county seat is Talladega, Alabama. Talladega is derived from the Muscogee (Creek) Native American word TVLVTEKE which translates to “border town.” Prior to Euro-American settlement in what is today Talladega County it was the home of the Abihka tribe of the Creek Confederacy. The county was established December 18, 1832 from land ceded by the Creek Indians. 

In Talladega County, the Riddle and Story Mines both produced lode gold, with placers found in Talladega Creek.

Digital Alabama Guide To Athens-Alabama

Athens Alabama

Athens is a city in Limestone County, in the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city is 21,897. The city is the county seat of Limestone County.

DeKalb County Alabama Map

DEKALB COUNTY ALABAMA

DeKalb County was once a part of the territory occupied by the Cherokee Indian nation. The coming of white men to the county occurred during the American Revolution when a British agent, Alexander Campbell, was sent here for the purpose of arousing the Cherokees against the southern colonies. In 1777, Campbell made his headquarters at Wills Town, a Cherokee Indian village located on Big Wills Creek near the present community of Lebanon. Campbell was successful in arousing a number of the Cherokees by promising them clothing and conquered territory in exchange for the scalps of white settlers.

Lee County Alabama Map

LEE COUNTY ALABAMA

Lee County is a county located in east central Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 140,247. The county seat is Opelika, and the largest city is Auburn. The county is named for General Robert E. Lee (1807–1870), who served as General in Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States in 1865. Lee County comprises the Auburn-Opelika, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Columbus-Auburn-Opelika, GA-AL Combined Statistical Area.

Gold in Coosa County Alabama

Gold in Coosa County Alabama
A belt of light green colored, highly pyritiferous, altered eruptive rock occurs paralleling the “Talladega” slate proper of the Talladega Mountains, on the south-eastern edge; and apparently maintaining its continuity along the line of strike, from the Coosa River, near the mouth of Weogufka Creek, towards the north-east into Cleburne county. This rock is distinguishable from the “Talladega” slates by the large percentage of unaltered pyrites it carries, as well as by its massive structure, hardness and toughness. These last characteristics cause it to be very difficult to drill and blast; while the quantity of crystals of pyrites imbedded in it has proved in the past very attractive to prospectors for copper ore. Gold in Rockford Alabama

Between Higgins’ Ferry and Rockford, the county seat of Coosa County. one sees the same schists and slates as occur on the west stde of Coosa River, but the dip is steeper and the texture coarser.

Confederate Memorial Park

Confederate Memorial Park

Confederate Memorial Park located in Marbury, Alabama, Autauga County, tells the story of Alabama’s Confederate soldier both during the Civil War and afterwards. The park is the site of Alabama’s only Confederate Soldiers’ Home. The site operated from 1902-1939 as a haven for disabled or indigent veterans of the Confederate army, their wives, and widows. The site included 22 buildings consisting of cottages, a hospital, dairy barn, mess hall, an elaborate water and sewage system, and Memorial Hall, an administration building which held offices, a library, and a large auditorium. Features of the 102-acre memorial park site include two cemeteries, Mountain Creek Post Office, Marbury Methodist Church, nature trail, covered pavilions, museum containing artifacts from the Alabama Old Soldiers Home, uniforms, weapons, and equipment used during the Civil War. The majority of veterans served in Alabama outfits, while others moved to Alabama after the war.

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama
May 4, 1865
Citronelle, Alabama

At the wars end Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor held command of the administrative entity called the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, with some 12,000 troops. Mobile, Alabama had fallen to Union forces in April of 1865 and Taylor had received news of General Johnston’s surrender to Union General Sherman. Taylor agreed to meet Union Major General E.R.S. Canby for a conference a few miles north of Mobile at Magee Farm, in the town of Kushla, on April 30th at which time they established a truce, terminable after 48 hours notice by either party. The Confederate general arrived at Magee Farm on a handcar propelled by two African Americans. A single officer, Colonel William Levy, accompanied them. General Canby, on the other hand, reached the meeting place accompanied by his staff in dress uniforms, a full brigade of Union troops and a military band. The two generals met 20 miles further north at Citronelle in Mobile County on May 4, 1865.