Choctaw_Village_by_Francois_Bernard

An Early Account OF The Choctaw Indians: Part 2

They have by way of furniture only an earthen pot in which to cook their food, some earthen pans for the same purpose, and some fanners or sieves and hampers to prepare their corn, which is their usual nourishment. They pound it in a wooden crusher (pile) or mortar, which they make out of the trunk of a tree, hollowed by means of burning embers. The pestle belonging to it is sometimes ten feet long and as small around as the arm. The upper end is an un-shaped mass which serves to weigh it down and to give force to this pestle in falling back, in order to crush the corn more easily. After it is thus crushed they sift it in order to separate the finer part.

An Early Account Of The Choctaw Indians Part 1

CONSIDERING the important part played by the Choctaw Indians in early

Louisiana history it is surprising what slight attention they received from early French writers. In the classic works of Le Page du Pratz, Dumont de Montigny, and others, we have pretentious descriptions of the Natchez, and considerable accounts of many of the other leading tribes on and near the Mississippi. Bossu, writing somewhat later, furnishes a considerable description of the Alabama Indians about Ft. Toulouse. But up to the present time we know of no French writer who made the huge Choctaw nation a special object of attention.