Bibb-County-Alabama

Historic Places and Ghost Towns in Bibb County Alabama

Historic Places and Ghost Towns in Bibb County Alabama
Affonee
Also known as Punyville. Post office in operation 1858-1866 and 1881-1903. Located along Affonee Creek about two miles west of Duff Settlement, Alabama. Ashby Station
Mentioned in “1865 Alabama: From Civil War to Uncivil Peace” by Christopher Lyle Mcilwain, Sr. as “Ashby station (lower case ‘s’) : “Wilson’s forces made quick work of the blast furnaces and rolling mill at the Bibb Naval Furnace at Brierfield near the Ashby station of the Alabama and Tennessee Rivers Railroad to Selma,…). Also mentioned in “The Story of Coal and Iron in Alabama” by Ethel Armes: “A branch railroad from Ashby station, one and a half miles distant, on the Alabama and Tennesse Rivers Railroad…”.

Mooresville Alabama

Mooresville is a town in Limestone County, Alabama, located southeast of the intersection of Interstate 565 and Interstate 65, and north of Wheeler Lake.
The entire town, described as a picturesque early 19th century village, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.

Andrew Ross Home

The Andrew Ross Home

Visitors to our area will soon discover new signs identifying the Andrew Ross Home, along with the Willstown Mission Cemetery and old Fort Payne Cabin Site, as official components of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The congressionally designated trail commemorates the tragic history of the 1838 removal of the Cherokee people from their ancestral homelands to territory in the west.

Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation.
Illustration of the Andrew Ross portion of Cherokee Plantation. Source: “The Cherokee Plantation, Fort Payne, Alabama”, by Royce Kershaw, Sr., 1970. The logs are still in the walls of the existing home.
Located just off the intersection of 45th Street and Godfrey Avenue NE, the Andrew Ross home is privately owned by Dr. Stephen Brewer. The present structure retains intact portions of the original home built in 1821 by Cherokee leader Andrew Ross and his wife, Susannah (Susan) Lowery Ross, who was the daughter of Assistant Principal Chief George Lowery. Long thought to be the home of Daniel Ross, Andrew’s father, recent research has revealed the home’s true origins. In addition to the home, which had an impressive second story balcony across the front, the property included stables, numerous outbuildings, farmlands, orchards and pastures.