LOWNDES COUNTY ALABAMA

Lowndes County Alabama Map

Lowndes County was formed from Montgomery, Dallas and Butler counties, by an act of the Alabama General Assembly on January 20, 1830. The county is named for South Carolina statesman William Lowndes. It is part of the Black Belt, where cotton plantations were developed in the antebellum years and agriculture continued as a dominant part of the economy into the 20th century.

Alabama Mines and Mining

Explore Alabama: Alabama mining region, rich and prolific as it is, does not monopolize all the mineral wealth of Alabama. In several of the counties of the Tennessee valley, in portions of the “cotton belt,” and also in the far south, called the “timber belt,” minerals have been found in more or less profusion.

Gold was first discovered in Alabama about the year 1830, and states that, shortly afterward, the placers and gravel washes became the seats of an active industry in the counties of Cleburne, Talladega, Randolph, Tallaposa, Coosa, Chilton, and perhaps, also of Clay. No record of these operations has been preserved; all that is now known is that large numbers of men were engaged in the work and that in some places, at least, it was found profitable.

TALLADEGA COUNTY ALABAMA

Talladega County Alabama Talladega County is a county of the state of Alabama. The county was established December 18, 1832 from land ceded by the Creek Indians.  As of the 2010 census, the population was 82,291. Its county seat is Talladega, Alabama. Talladega is derived from the Muscogee (Creek) Native American word TVLVTEKE which translates […]

Trail of Tears

This picture, The Trail of Tears, was painted by Robert Lindneux in 1942. It commemorates the suffering of the Cherokee people under forced removal. If any depictions of the "Trail of Tears" were created at the time of the march, they have not survived.

The Trail of Tears The Trail of Tears was a series of forced removals of Native American nations from their ancestral homelands in the Southeastern United States to an area west of the Mississippi River that had been designated as Native Territory. In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson’s Indian removal policy in 1830, […]