Alabama Metal Detecting in National Parks, Recreational Areas or National Monuments

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A statue commemorating a police attack on a peaceful protestor at Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama. Photo © Alan Spears/NPCA.

A statue commemorating a police attack on a peaceful protestor at Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama. Photo © Alan Spears/NPCA./NPCA

A statue commemorating a police attack on a peaceful protestor at Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama. Photo © Alan Spears/NPCA.

Alabama Metal Detecting in National Parks, Recreational Areas or National Monuments

It is illegal to metal detect in any National Park, National Recreational Area or at a National Monument. No metal detecting allowed in any of these National properties in Alabama .

Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument

Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument is a new national park unit located in Birmingham, Alabama. It is a park in progress with limited services, and in the coming years services will be added to the park in cooperation with our partners. Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

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Freedom Riders National Monument

Freedom Riders National Monument is a new national park unit located in Anniston, Alabama. It is a park in progress with limited services. In the coming years services will be added to the park in cooperation with our partners. Read our Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

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Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

On 27 March 1814, Major General Andrew Jackson ‘s army of 3,300 men attacked Chief Menawa’s 1,000 Red Stick Creek warriors fortified in a horseshoe shaped bend of the Tallapoosa River. Over 800 Red Sticks died that day. The battle ended the Creek War, resulted in a land cession of 23,000,000 acres to the United States and created a national hero of Andrew Jackson.

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Little River Canyon National Preserve

 

The park is located in DeKalb and Cherokee Counties in Alabama. We are in the upper northeast corner of the state. The Visitor Center is located in Fort Payne, Alabama.

Your first stop should be at the Little River Canyon Center at 4322 Little River Trail NE (472 AL Hwy 35 for GPS).Come let us tell you what is available and get a park map before you begin exploring the park. A movie, gift shop, and restrooms are also available at this facility.

Little River Canyon National Preserve is divided into three parts: Backcountry Area, Scenic Drive and Canyon Mouth Park. There are also two waterfalls along AL Highway 35 that people also like to visit (Little River Falls from Boardwalk and Grace’s High Falls).

Little River is unique because it flows for most of its length atop Lookout Mountain in northeast Alabama. Forested uplands, waterfalls, canyon rims and bluffs, pools, boulders, and sandstone cliffs offer settings for a variety of recreational activities. Natural resources and cultural heritage come together to tell the story of the Preserve, a special place in the Southern Appalachians.

 

The Muscle Shoals National Heritage Area began to take form in 1999 following a visionary community event, “Muscle Shoals Reconsidered.” During this conference, community leaders addressed the issue of how to create a relationship between the cultural aspects of the region and the area’s quality of life. Following a second conference, “Muscle Shoals Reconsidered II,” two committees were developed to further explore the issue. In 2000, a study of the cultural heritage of the Muscle Shoals Region identified opportunities for coalition building, established an inventory of assets, weighed the liabilities and validated earlier assumptions. The study also helped better define the themes, boundaries and stories of the Muscle Shoals region. In 2001, Alabama Rep. Robert “Bud” Cramer introduced legislation into the House of Representatives directing the Secretary of the Interior to study the suitability and feasibility of establishing the heritage area. The legislation was signed into law in 2002, and the designation was approved in 2009.

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Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail

The 450-mile foot trail that became known as the Natchez Trace was the lifeline through the Old Southwest. You can experience portions of that journey the way earlier travelers did – on foot. Today there are five separate trails totaling over 60 miles and they are administered by the Natchez Trace Parkway.

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Natchez Trace Parkway

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile recreational road and scenic drive through three states. It roughly follows the “Old Natchez Trace” a historic travel corridor used by American Indians, “Kaintucks,” European settlers, slave traders, soldiers, and future presidents. Today, people can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping along the parkway.

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Russell Cave National Monument

At 7.5 miles, Russell Cave is the 3rd longest cave in Alabama although it is the history of the people that lived here that has made this site nationally significant. Aside from Russell Cave there are over 1500 caves that have been explored in Jackson County. This calculates to more caves per square mile than anywhere else in America. Caving is permitted in many north Alabama caves however; access to Russell Cave is limited to the geologically unusual cave entrance. This flat, protected space is where artifacts have been found dating back to some of the earliest human occurrences in North America.

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Selma To Montgomery National Historic Trail

Start your journey in Marion, Alabama, the location where Jimmie Lee Jackson was shot by an Alabama State Trooper on February 18, 1965 and died February 26 in Selma, Alabama. Mr. Jackson’s death was among the catalyst that lead to the Selma to Montgomery March in 1965.

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Trail Of Tears National Historic Trail

Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. They traveled by foot, horse, wagon, or steamboat in 1838-1839.

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Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site

Before the first African American military pilots became known as the “Red Tails” they wore striped tails as they began their flight training in the Army’s PT-17 Stearman bi-plane. Their flying adventure started at Moton Field, in Tuskegee, Alabama, where the Army Air Corps began a military “experiment” to see if Negroes could be trained to fly combat aircraft. Come–share their adventure!

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Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site

In 1881, Booker T. Washington arrived in Alabama and started building Tuskegee Institute both in reputation and literally brick by brick. He recruited the best and the brightest to come and teach here including George Washington Carver who arrived in 1896. Carver’s innovations in agriculture, especially with peanuts, expanded Tuskegee’s standing throughout the country.

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